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Climate Action for Agriculture: Strengthening the Engagement of Agriculture Sectors to Implement the Climate Change Elements of the 2030 Agenda in Asia and the Pacific
















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    Project
    Building Disaster and Climate Resilience of Agriculture Sector to Achieve The SDGs in Asia - TCP/RAS/3703 2023
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    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) recognizes the need for more resilient food and agriculture systems in its Strategy on Climate Change to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and end hunger and poverty. The agriculture sector is facing increasing risks due to climate change, natural disasters and food chain crises, which put pressure on the sector facing multiple challenges of land use changes, urbanization and market forces. Nearly all FAO Members in the Asia and the Pacific region have a priority area or country outcome on resilience to disasters and climate change, as recognized in their Country Programme Frameworks. However, vulnerability and risk assessment (VRA) in the agriculture sector is still limited globally due to constraints such as the lack of standard tools and capacity and poor management of agriculture disaster damage and loss (D&L). The regional conference on "Strengthening resilient food and agriculture systems" highlighted the urgent need for standard VRA tools for all agricultural subsectors to understand the underlying risk factors, both within and outside the agriculture sector. FAO has developed the methodology for evaluating agriculture disaster D&L, covering all four agricultural sub-sectors (crops, livestock, fisheries/aquaculture and forestry). However, D&L data is often collected on an ad-hoc basis without standardized templates, methods and information management systems. Relevant and good quality data and statistics are critical to measuring the impacts and costs of disasters, anticipating future risks and establishing development goals addressing these risks. All FAO Members in the region of Asia and the Pacific have committed to monitoring and reporting on the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement and the SDGs. Technical support is required not only to build capacity to apply D&L assessment methodology but also to ensure an institutional approach in strengthening agriculture D&L information management. Such an approach will bring together agriculture sectors and also National Statistics Office, National Disaster Management Agencies and other stakeholders to systematically improve agriculture D&L data, information and management system. To this end, Cambodia, the The Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mongolia and Timor-Leste requested technical support to apply the FAO D&L methodology.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Dare to Understand and Measure (DaTUM). A literature review of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) frameworks for Climate-Smart Agriculture. 2019
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    The main objective of this report is to review the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) frameworks, tools and guidance documents that are available for climate-smart agriculture (CSA), and in particular for objective (“pillar”) two on adaptation and resilience. The report is a literature review and does not propose a new methodology. It is not an exhaustive list, but summarises the main M&E frameworks. This report represents the first step towards the development of operational guidelines for the design and implementation of national M&E frameworks for CSA, to be developed during the first quarter of 2019. The envisioned operational guidelines will address the core constraints and needs of Member States on both the design and implementation of an M&E system that can simultaneously address CSA and sector reporting requirements for the 2030 Agenda climate instruments. These guidelines will address the principal need expressed by Member States that M&E systems and indicators should be simple and not onerous. The intended users are practitioners designing CSA projects at country level and policy-makers coordinating national-sector monitoring and reporting efforts on climate change under the following three global agreements: the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Paris Agreement of 2015.
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    Book (series)
    Evaluation of FAO’s support to climate action (SDG 13) and the implementation of the FAO Strategy on Climate Change (2017) 2021
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    This evaluation assesses the extent to which FAO adopted an effective, coherent and transformative approach to its work on climate action from 2015 to 2020, by contributing to the achievement of SDG 13 targets and the Paris Agreement. The methodology included portfolio analysis, quantitative content analysis of over 500 documents, participatory stakeholder workshops, desk reviews, interviews with 488 stakeholders, analysis of key FAO products, 3 global surveys, and 13 country case studies. The evaluation’s findings are (i) FAO’s Strategic Framework is aligned with SDG 13 and the Paris Agreement. However, FAO has not expressed a long-term vision on its leadership role in agriculture for climate action; nor does FAO governance yet reflect a clear and strategic focus on its mission on climate action; (ii) The 2017 Climate Change Strategy has effectively supported FAO’s work, but it is not fully integrated into corporate decision-making; (iii) FAO has made relevant contributions by supporting national capacity building for climate action; (iv) FAO’s contributions to SDG 13 and the uptake of products and tools are not systematically monitored and reported; (v) There is little alignment of portfolios between divisions and no systematic approach to trade-offs. Consequently, the root causes of climate change on agriculture are not being addressed in an integrated way; (vi) FAO has strong capacity, but the current business model results in uneven distribution of human and financial resources and in fragmented, short-term projects reach; (vii) FAO contributed to climate adaptation and mitigation by collaborating with Members and other partners, although it has engaged less in innovative partnerships with the private sector, financing institutions and civil society; (viii) FAO has progressed on the inclusion of gender-specific climate action initiatives. The recommendations of the evaluation include developing a corporate narrative on climate change and food systems; formulating a new Climate Change Strategy and action plan; improving the climate change labelling of its project portfolio; mainstreaming climate action into all offices, divisions and levels, and including coordination and guidance to embed procedures in the project cycle, quality assurance and learning mechanisms; adopting a climate action-focused programmatic approach; running an assessment to identify capacity gaps, needs and opportunities and, accordingly, strengthening the capacity of staffing, funding and inter-office communication; enhancing its partnerships and seeking out innovative partnerships; and mainstreaming the core “leave no one behind” by including women, youth, the extreme poor, indigenous peoples and other vulnerable groups.

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