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Technical Support in Developing Climate Resilient Coconut-based Farming Systems - TCP/PHI/3708








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Report of the expert consultation on coconut beetle outbreak in APPPC member countries 2004
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    An account of the consultation held at the FAO regional office in Bangkok from 26 to 27 October 2004, attended by 17 representatives from 11 countries, to exchange experiences and lessons learned among member countries of the Asia-Pacific Plant Protection Commission (APPPC) that are facing or may face coconut beetle outbreaks. Brontispa longissima is one of the most damaging pests of coconut in Asia and the Pacific and has spread to new areas in the region at a rapid pace. The beetle can cause s ignificant production losses, and high infestation levels may result in tree death. The traditional pest management approach based on insecticide use has not been able to stop the spread and the damage continues unabated. Experiences from countries in the Pacific demonstrate that the insect can be quickly, effectively and sustainably contained using classical biological control. This publication brings together the papers and presentations of the consultation as well as recommendations for commo n strategies to contain the pest.
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    Maldives and FAO: Achievements and Success Stories 2011
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    Maldives became a member of FAO in 1971 and was accredited to the FAO Representative’s office in Sri Lanka in 1979. The economy of Maldives has grown rapidly since 1975, making impressive socio-economic progress when measured by improvements in socio-economic indicators and poverty reduction. The government has played a central role in the rapid growth of fisheries and tourism, which are the main foreign exchange earners of the country. Food security in Maldives has unique features as the countr y depends on imports for most of its food needs, including rice, which is the country’s staple grain. Outside of Malé, fishing and subsistence agriculture are the main sources of food security and livelihoods for the vast majority of the people. The agricultural sector of Maldives is based primarily on coconuts and other tree crops with only some 4 000 hectares under other agriculture crops. In response to the current food and fuel crisis, Maldives is integrating food security into national plan ning. It has removed tariffs on imported food items, agricultural inputs and fuel and is intensifying and diversifying agriculture and fisheries. Maldives is also promoting and strengthening small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in both these sectors, while providing financial support for small growers and fishers in rural areas. Climate change is central to all discussions about food security in Maldives, because it is adversely affecting crops and fish stocks and reducing land area as the sea le vel rises. Developing agriculture as the third pillar of the economy, after tourism and fishing, is one of the priorities of the 7th National Development Plan, which is being implemented at present. The government is working with FAO and IFAD as well as the private sector to develop agriculture by introducing new and innovative techniques and technology that would make farming into a vehicle for commercially viable sustainable rural development. Since the early 1970’s, FAO has provided assistanc e to the government through national and regional programmes to address the needs and priorities of the country. Direct support from FAO in the form of targeted Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) projects has totalled US$9.5 million. Additionally, Maldives has been a recipient of support from numerous regional TCP projects. The country also received substantial amounts of emergency assistance for post tsunami recovery in 2005 and 2006. Donors supporting development through FAO in Maldives inc lude: Japan, Finland, Sweden, Belgium, EC, Germany, Saudi Arabia, and the Netherlands.
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    Document
    SIDS solutions innovations profile. Farming information: Pest management (Fiji)
    SIDS Solutions Forum, 30-31 August 2021
    2021
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    As part of the SIDS Solutions Forum, 30-31 August 2021, FAO collected innovations and creative digital technologies that respond to local problems and challenges. The coconut (Cocos nucifera), or “Tree of Life,” is one of the most important traditional crops in Fiji. Coconut insect pests and diseases affect the quality and quantity of nut production, especially the coconut rhinoceros beetle (CRB), Oryctes rhinoceros (L). This flyer presents a GPS tracking system that tracks pheromone (ethyl-4-methyl octanoate) bucket traps to ssist in attracting, trapping and killing adult beetles.

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