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Geographic determinants of rice self-sufficiency in Southeast Asia








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    Book (series)
    Rice self-sufficiency in Rwanda: policies to ensure it does not remain an elusive goal
    FAO Agricultural Development Economics Policy Brief 37
    2021
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    This policy brief presents a snapshot review of how key policies have affected rice in Rwanda in the run up to the Government of Rwanda’s target to become self-sufficient in rice by 2018, while at the same time boosting the commodity’s competitiveness in local and regional markets. The brief looks at how trade and domestic policies in place have supported and incentivized rice production, why achievement of the self-sufficiency goal by 2018 has however been extremely challenging and how trade barriers (i.e. import tariffs, established to protect the domestic market are likely to impact both the production and consumption of rice in the country) in a scenario of sustained imports growth and production deficit. Finally, the brief underlines three key policy actions that would help to improve the welfare of domestic rice consumers, to boost demand for local rice in the domestic market against imported rice varieties, and to develop a more efficient and productive sector that could even boost exports of local rice to emerging regional markets.
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    Project
    Improving Rice Productivity in Bhutan to Enhance Rice Self-Sufficiency - TCP/BHU/3602 2020
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    In Bhutan, mountainous terrain limits agricultural land to just over three percent of the country, of which paddy cultivated area comprises 23 000 hectares, and is farmed by 28 000 households. There are three distinct rice ecosystems in the country, which are defined by three altitudes: low, mid and high. Rice yield is dependent on altitude, with the highest yields being produced in the high-altitude areas. However, as the altitude grows steeper, the terrain gets rougher; and most paddy fields are on narrowly terraced slopes. This limits farm mechanization, and the construction of irrigation infrastructures is costly. There is potential for increasing yield in low altitudes, with a more stable irrigation system and drought-tolerant rainfed rice varieties. Against this background, the project aimed to support development in the different agro-ecological zones (AEZs), to contribute to the Government's goal of achieving a higher level of rice self-sufficiency, through increased rice productivity and production.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Rice value chain in Ghana – Prospective analysis and strategies for sustainable and pro-poor growth 2021
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    Based on past experience of partnership on support to National Rice Development Strategies (NRDS) within Coalition for African Rice Development (CARD), AfricaRice and FAO decided to conduct a series of rice policy reviews for Ghana, Ivory Coast and Mali in 2019. The following study uses the Ex-ante Carbon-balance Value Chain tool (EX-ACT VC), developed in 2016 by FAO, to assess the Ghanaian rice value chain’s environmental (in terms of climate mitigation and climate resilience) and socio-economic impact for a business as usual scenario in 2020 compared to a growth scenario for 2030. Promotion of good agricultural practices (GAP), the reduction of crop losses, and an increase in the use of inputs and mechanization are the different strategies considered in this study that would help in realizing the aim of self-sufficiency. Through the implementation of these practices, along with the expansion of rice growing areas, the income per day of work per farmer would increase by more than USD 4, reaching approx. USD 9/day of work in the value chain. The gross production value of the rice value chain would reach USD 856 million, which is an additional USD 511 million in gross production value by 2030. An upgraded rice value chain would also result in an increase in the value added by USD 378 million by 2030 with an overall positive carbon balance that would emit 284 852 tCO2-e of greenhouse gas emissions.

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