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Perspective from Latin America and the Caribbean







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    Book (series)
    Regional Overview of Food Security and Nutrition in Latin America and the Caribbean 2020
    Food security and nutrition for lagging territories
    2021
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    The goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that are related to food security and nutrition will not be achieved as long as, in some territories in Latin America and the Caribbean, populations continue to live with malnutrition rates. Economic opportunities in these areas are often limited, public services are scant, and exposure to severe climate events is high. The public policies promoted in the region have had less impact in these historically lagging territories, and there is a pressing need to produce a new agenda of public instruments that address the characteristics of the communities that inhabit them. The full and sustainable development of the territories that are falling behind is not only an obligation in terms of the realization of the rights of their inhabitants; it would also allow these territories to activate their social, economic, environmental and cultural potential, to the benefit of all societies. It is hoped that the 2020 Regional Overview will help to highlight the challenges experienced by the territories with the worst indicators in terms of food and nutrition, and that it will serve to mobilize political commitment and public attention towards those areas that are most highly lagging The year 2020 will be remembered for many decades as the year of the COVID-19 pandemic. The indicators of the 2030 Agenda that are used in this publication do not yet show the different impacts of COVID-19. However, there are references to the possible implications of the pandemic for the future.
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    Project
    Strengthening Resource Mobilization Strategies to Eradicate Hunger and Malnutrition, and to Foster Sustainable Rural Development and Climate-Resilient Agriculture - TCP/RLA/3718 2022
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    For more than 25 years, official development assistance ( has been distributed on the basis of a classification of countries by income Developed by the World Bank, this establishes a graduation system which places countries in high, upper middle, lower middle and low income categories While this methodology certainly provides highly useful information and data for macro economic analysis, it provides an average figure and therefore fails to highlight inequalities within the countries The Latin American and Caribbean region faithfully reflects this situation, as it has yet to efficiently address the challenges of halting malnutrition, strengthening rural agriculture and building resilience to climate change Despite the region’s growth in recent years, with most countries in the high and upper middle income brackets, the idea that they can take control of their own development, through domestic financing, fails to take into account the inequalities that can be generated in terms of domestic wealth distribution, climate vulnerability or social and political instability It is also possible to identify pockets of absolute poverty within each country, which still require technical and financial expertise and, hence, continue to require international cooperation A greater contribution is expected from the private sector through financial instruments that attract investment in line with the Sustainable Development Goals ( Currently, countries and stakeholders in the region have insufficient knowledge of private financing mechanisms and public private partnerships for project development, thereby hampering access to new resources The project aimed to develop conceptual frameworks on resource mobilization trends and opportunities for Latin American and Caribbean countries, while striking a structural balance between the different thematic areas in which FAO provides technical assistance and support The aim was to assist countries in identifying sources of financing that would enable them to achieve the SDGs, and to bring the corresponding strategic partners closer to the region and actively seek new private financing mechanisms At the national level, the objective was to increase the resources available to execute technical collaboration projects, through close interaction between governments, cooperation agencies and the private sector The desired outcome was to provide the region with a strategy for mobilizing resources to combat hunger and poverty among rural populations that are also vulnerable to climate change For this purpose, regional coordination is needed to support the project, which will help identify experiences and lessons learned that can be replicated or adapted in other countries at a later stage.
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    Document
    Investment in agricultural mechanization in Africa. Conclusions and recommendations of a Round Table Meeting of Experts 2011
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    Many African countries have economies strongly dominated by the agricultural sector and in some this generates a significant proportion of the gross domestic product. It provides employment for the majority of Africa’s people, but investment in the sector remains low. One of the keys to successful development in Asia and Latin America has been mechanization. By contrast, the use of tractors in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has actually declined over the past fourty years and, compared with other wo rld regions, their use in SSA today remains very limited. It is now clear that unless some positive remedial action is taken, the situation can only worsen. In most African countries there will be more urban dwellers than rural ones in the course of the next two to three decades. It is critical to ensure food security for the entire population but feeding the increasing urban population cannot be assured by an agricultural system that is largely dominated by hand tool technology. In order to r edress the situation, FAO, UNIDO and many African experts are convinced that support is urgently needed for renewed investment in mechanization. Furthermore, mechanization is inextricably linked with agro-industrialization, and there is a need to clarify the priorities in the context of a broader agro-industrial development strategy. This must, however, be done in the right way, taking into account critical factors for success and sustainability. This issue and others were addressed at a thre e-day Round Table Meeting of experts that was convened in Arusha, Tanzania, in June 2009 with the intention of providing guidance on the key strategies and good practices for maximizing the benefits and sustainability of investments in agricultural mechanization in Africa. This report summarizes the deliberations of this Round Table Meeting.

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