Thumbnail Image

Strengthening livelihoods through control of Peste des Petits Ruminants-TCP/INT/3503








Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus Infection at the Wildlife–Livestock Interface in the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem, 2015–2019 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a viral disease of goats and sheep that occurs in Africa, the Middle East and Asia with a severe impact on livelihoods and livestock trade. Many wild artiodactyls are susceptible to PPR virus (PPRV) infection, and some outbreaks have threatened endangered wild populations. The role of wild species in PPRV epidemiology is unclear, which is a knowledge gap for the Global Strategy for the Control and Eradication of PPR. These studies aimed to investigate PPRV infection in wild artiodactyls in the Greater Serengeti and Amboseli ecosystems of Kenya and Tanzania. Out of 132 animals purposively sampled in 2015–2016, 19.7% were PPRV seropositive by ID Screen PPR competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA; IDvet, France) from the following species: African buffalo, wildebeest, topi, kongoni, Grant’s gazelle, impala, Thomson’s gazelle, warthog and gerenuk, while waterbuck and lesser kudu were seronegative. In 2018–2019, a cross-sectional survey of randomly selected African buffalo and Grant’s gazelle herds was conducted. The weighted estimate of PPRV seroprevalence was 12.0% out of 191 African buffalo and 1.1% out of 139 Grant’s gazelles. All ocular and nasal swabs and faeces were negative by PPRV real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Investigations of a PPR-like disease in sheep and goats confirmed PPRV circulation in the area by rapid detection test and/or RT-qPCR. These results demonstrated serological evidence of PPRV infection in wild artiodactyl species at the wildlife–livestock interface in this ecosystem where PPRV is endemic in domestic small ruminants. Exposure to PPRV could be via spillover from infected small ruminants or from transmission between wild animals, while the relatively low seroprevalence suggests that sustained transmission is unlikely. Further studies of other major wild artiodactyls in this ecosystem are required, such as impala, Thomson’s gazelle and wildebeest.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Progress to Control and Eradication of Peste des Petits Ruminants in the Southern African Development Community Region 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In southern Africa, small ruminants are an important source of nutrition and income to resource-poor small holder farmers. After spreading from West to Central and Eastern Africa, peste des petits ruminants (PPR) emerged in the United Republic of Tanzania in 2008 and has since been reported in Angola, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Comoros. The disease can cause considerable morbidity and mortality in naïve sheep and goat populations and severely impact rural livelihoods, particularly those of women. Gaps in the knowledge of PPR epidemiology still exist, particularly around the role of small-ruminant movement and the role of the abundant wildlife in southern Africa. The capacity of veterinary services to undertake surveillance and control PPR is heterogeneous within the region, with vaccination being limited. The Pan African strategy for the control and eradication of PPR mirrors the Global Strategy and provides the framework for the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region to meet the 2030 goal of eradication. Five countries and one zone within Namibia are officially PPR free according to OIE Standards. Most countries have developed national strategies for the control and eradication of PPR. To strengthen national and regional PPR eradication programme goals, there is a need for a regional risk-based surveillance adapted to infected, high-risk and lower-risk countries that will enable targeted and efficient control, rapid response to incursions and prevention of spread as well as improved preparedness.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Strengthening Capacities for the Prevention of Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) in Eritrea - TCP/ERI/3607 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In Eritrea, 75 percent of the population is engaged in livelihood activities within the agriculture, animal husbandry and fishing sectors, which account for 16 9 percent of the gross domestic product ( and 20 30 percent of export commodities Across the country’s six agro ecological zones, livestock rearing practices are variable, although cattle 71 percent), sheep 50 percent) and goats 60 percent) are predominantly raised in the western lowlands The livestock sector alone accounts for 39 percent of the agricultural GDP and 4 6 percent of the national GDP Peste des Petits Ruminants ( poses a major threat to sheep and goat production in Eritrea The disease was first confirmed in 1993 and, since its initial incursion in the Tsorona region, PPR outbreaks have caused extensive concerns across the country Critically, in newly infected areas, mortality rates have been estimated to reach as high as 90 percent In 2014 17 outbreaks were reported and the frequency of outbreaks were on the rise In response to the 2014 epidemic, 501 300 animals were vaccinated, but this only represented less than 8 percent of the national population, while the recommended target by the FAO/OIE Global Strategy for the Control and Eradication of PPR is 75 percent Recent assessments have indicated that PPR is often misdiagnosed and under reported by pastoralists, the national laboratory capacity for PPR diagnosis is limited, the national PPR surveillance system requires strengthening and preventing the spread of PPR will require more effective post vaccination evaluation The presence and threat of PPR affects the livelihood and food security of the Eritrean population Not only does it have direct effects on animal rearing production levels, it influences economic activities, such as trade, which take place beyond the level of daily activities performed by sheep and goat farmers In an effort to move closer toward PPR eradication, the project aims to strengthen the national capacity of Eritrea to prevent and control threats posed by the disease.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.