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Surveillance and Information Sharing Operational Tool

An operational tool of the Tripartite Zoonoses Guide









Download the Excel-based tool (SIS OT workbook)

Last updated date 28/02/2023


WHO, FAO, WOAH. 2022. Surveillance and Information Sharing Operational Tool - An operational tool of the Tripartite Zoonoses Guide. Geneva, Rome and Paris.




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    Taking a Multisectoral One Health Approach : A Tripartite Guide to Addressing Zoonotic Diseases in Countries 2019
    The 2019 FAO-OIE-WHO (Tripartite) zoonoses guide, “Taking A Multisectoral, One Health Approach: A Tripartite Guide to Addressing Zoonotic Diseases in Countries” (2019 TZG) is being jointly developed to provide member countries with practical guidance on OH approaches to build national mechanisms for multisectoral coordination, communication, and collaboration to address zoonotic disease threats at the animal-human-environment interface. The 2019 TZG updates and expands on the guidance in the one previous jointly-developed, zoonoses-specific guidance document: the 2008 Tripartite “Zoonotic Diseases: A Guide to Establishing Collaboration between Animal and Human Health Sectors at the Country Level”, developed in WHO South-East Asia Region and Western Pacific Region. The 2019 TZG supports building by countries of the resilience and capacity to address emerging and endemic zoonotic diseases such as avian influenza, rabies, Ebola, and Rift Valley fever, as well as food-borne diseases and antimicrobial resistance, and to minimize their impacts on health, livelihoods, and economies. It additionally supports country efforts to implement WHO International Health Regulations (2005) and OIE international standards, to address gaps identified through external and internal health system evaluations, and to achieve targets of the Sustainable Development Goals. The 2019 TZG provides relevant country ministries and agencies with lessons learned and good practices identified from country-level experiences in taking OH approaches for preparedness, prevention, detection and response to zoonotic disease threats, and provides guidance on multisectoral communication, coordination, and collaboration. It informs on regional and country-level OH activities and relevant unisectoral and multisectoral tools available for countries to use.
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    Strong surveillance systems are critical to identify and respond to human and animal threats rapidly, and to develop efficient disease control programmes. To support countries in building their national veterinary surveillance systems, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) developed the Surveillance Evaluation Tool (SET). SET provides countries with a comprehensive and repeatable methodology to evaluate animal disease surveillance at all levels (central, intermediate and field), leading to the development of specific recommendations for improvement in the form of a prioritized action plan. Additionally, in 2020 FAO developed the SET Biothreat Detection Module (SET-BT) covering attributes related to the surveillance of agro-terrorism and agro-crime. A SET evaluation and SET-BT pilot mission was conducted in Jordan in May 2021 in close collaboration with the country’s veterinary services and law enforcement agencies. The validation of the SET outputs and recommendations by the Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO) of Jordan and Jordan’s security forces in the form of a report will provide guidance to the veterinary services as well as financial and technical partners on ways to improve Jordan’s animal and zoonotic disease surveillance, and will contribute to a multifaceted approach to capacity building in the country, and in the region. Results and recommendations of the SET-BT module were kept as confidential for security reasons. This activity was organized with the support of a grant from the World Organisation for Animal Health (WOAH). The grant was provided through funding from Global Affairs Canada's Weapons Threat Reduction Program as part of the Building Resilience Against Agro-terrorism and Agro-crime project.

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