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Establishing a Portal for Water Accounting Information - MTF/GLO/231/ASB









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    Book (series)
    Mid-term evaluation of the project "Monitoring water productivity by remote sensing as a tool to assess possibilities to reduce water productivity gaps
    Project code: GCP/INT/229/NET
    2020
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    While population growth and economic development are putting unprecedented pressure on renewable, but finite water resources, especially in arid regions, scarce land and water resources are affecting food security and sustainable water management. FAO identified the need to implement a digital database built upon remote sensing and information technologies that can monitor and report on agricultural water productivity over Africa and Near East, accessible through the FAO Water Productivity through Open access of Remotely sensed derived data portal (WaPOR). The WaPOR database is now operational at continental level (all African and Near East countries covered by the 250 m spatial resolution data), national level (two beneficiary countries can access the WaPOR database at 100 m resolution) and subnational level with a spatial resolution of about 30 m, so far including eight areas of interest (river basins or irrigation schemes). Water Accounting Plus (WA+) reports based on remote sensing have been completed for three river basins as planned (Litani in Lebanon, Awash in Ethiopia and Jordan basin). An action framework at national level for capacity building and participatory decision making is currently being developed to make effective a “demand-driven” approach based on national and local needs.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    The Global Framework on Water Scarcity in Agriculture 2018
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    Water scarcity is one of the greatest challenges of the twenty-first century. Agriculture is both a cause and a casualty of water scarcity. It accounts for an estimated 70 percent of global water withdrawals, with freshwater resources heavily stressed by irrigation and food production. While demand for water for agriculture and other uses are increasing rapidly, climate change also affects fresh water resources negatively both in terms of quantity and quality. More frequent and severe dro ughts are having an impact on agricultural production, while rising temperatures translate into increased crop water demand. Water use is growing at more than twice the rate of population increase, and a 60 percent surge in food demand is expected by 2050. There is an urgent need, therefore, to address water scarcity.
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    Document
    Towards the Future We Want - End Hunger and make the transition to sustainable agricultural and food systems - Brochure 2012
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    Healthy and productive life depends on food and nutrition security. Yet hundreds of millions of people suffer from hunger and other nutritional deficiencies, and the majority of those people derive their livelihoods from agriculture. We must recognize that the millions of people who manage agricultural systems - from the very poorest to the most commercialized producers constitute the largest group of natural resource managers on earth. Their decisions, as well as those of the world's 7 billio n consumers, are key to global food security and the health of the world's ecosystems. The conditions needed to achieve universal food security and nutrition, responsible environmental stewardship and greater fairness in food management intersect in agricultural and food systems at global, national and local levels. In the face of an expected global population of 9 billion in 2050, pressure on the world's agricultural and food systems will grow. Unless purposeful action is taken, even if the 60 percent increase in food production needed to meet effective demand is achieved, some 300 million people may still remain without adequate access to food. We can no longer ignore the interdependencies between hunger and malnutrition, and natural resources and the environment. We have known since the first Rio summit about the nature of the challenges we face and how to address them. Where we have fallen short is in recognizing and addressing the governance challenges that must be overcome in ord er to take the steps needed to achieve commonly agreed goals. Ultimately, success in eradicating hunger and the transition to sustainable patterns of consumption and production will depend on the decisions of billions of individuals – both producers and consumers. To make sure that proper policies are implemented, fair and effective governance systems are needed – systems that are transparent, participatory, results-focused and accountable.

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