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Mechanized Raised-Bed Irrigation - Production Package

Water Scarcity Initiative (WSI)









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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Solar powered water lifting - For Irrigation in the Nile Delta
    Water Scarcity Initiative (WSI)
    2018
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    In the Nile Delta, Egypt, irrigation canals are frequently located below ground level, necessitating the use of pumps to lift water to the fields. This pumping is dependent on the use of fossil fuels, directly with diesel and indirectly with electricity. Recently, the agricultural sector is facing an energy crisis, as increasing electricity demand from urban areas results in frequent shortages and blackouts. This results in disrupting the regular irrigation scheduling to satisfy the crop-water requirements with the consequence of crop yields decline. In addition, the cost of pumping is expected to increse. Therefore, a low-cost alternative source of energy is required to ensure farmers have a reliable system to pump and irrigate.
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    Book (series)
    Demand for products of irrigated agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa 2006
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    If irrigated production is to make a significant contribution to food security and economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), it will have to be re-structured across the region as a whole. This is the main conclusion of a study undertaken by FAO to analyse the drivers of demand for irrigated production in SSA. Steeply rising commercial food import bills for staple crops across SSA are indicative of the level of demand that is not being met from domestic production. The increase in area und er equipped/spate irrigation for the whole of Africa over the last ten years amounts to 1.27 million ha, which is equal to about 127 000 ha per year. This rate of growth has proved too low to have an impact on food import bills and buffer regional food security. However, within subregional trading groups there is scope for consolidation of market supply. Some key conclusions emerge: first, matching the structure of the irrigated subsector to the structure of demand is essential; second, it w ill be necessary to realize the value of the existing asset base where supply chains, storage and processing can be concentrated to address specific, well identified markets; third, prior to new public expenditure or the encouragement of private investment, the full implications of price impacts must be taken into account; and, finally, the costs of supplying into specific crop markets will need to be assessed. With these provisions in mind and the political and institutional constraints not withstanding, irrigated production opportunities in SSA could be realized where natural resources and markets coincide, but only through a great deal more attention to costs of production, price formation, effective water allocation mechanisms, economically efficient water use and strong, responsive institutions.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Arsenic contamination of irrigation water, soil and crops in Bangladesh: risk implications for sustainable agriculture and food safety in Asia 2006
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    Arsenic in groundwater is a major health concern in Asia and the risks from using shallow tubewells for drinking-water are well known. At present, 12 countries in the region have reported high arsenic levels in parts of their groundwater and recent studies have documented the potential risks from arsenic in irrigation water. The most well known concern is arsenic contamination entering the food chain, affecting food safety. This poses a potential dietary risk to human health in addition to the r isk from drinking contaminated groundwater. Less well known but potentially more serious is the risk to crop production. Continuous build up of arsenic in the soil from arsenic contaminated irrigation water may reduce crop yields, thus affecting the nutritional status and incomes of rural farming communities. As part of the green revolution, millions of shallow tubewells were installed throughout Asia over the last three decades. This resulted in a sharp increase of groundwater extraction for ir rigation. Considering the high number of arsenic contaminated tubewells, the amount of contaminated irrigation water entering the soil and its effects on crop yields and toxity to plants as well as to livestock and freshwater fisheries are of urgent concern. This must-read technical report for those involved with the issue of arsenic in irrigation water examines the available knowledge to date, focusing on Bangladesh where most studies on arsenic contaminated irrigation water have been carried o ut. Specific attention is given to rice owing to its importance in Asia and because it is one of the crops most sensitive to arsenic contamination. The report identifies knowledge gaps, the risks to food safety and crop production and the possible threat to sustainable development in the region. The author provides recommendations to key stakeholders concerned and advocates an integrated regional programme covering both crop production and food safety aspects within the framework of land degrada tion. Most importantly, the scale of the problem needs to be quantified and appropriate management options developed and disseminated.

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