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'Are we there yet?' Getting to Zero Hunger











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    Book (stand-alone)
    From Fome Zero to Zero Hunger
    A global perspective
    2019
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    Hunger is on the rise again in the world after a decade of decline. Hunger not only cruelly affects the well-being of people, it also undermines national development prospects of any kind. It erodes human capital and productivity and exists in direct contradiction to the human right to adequate food. But hunger is a scourge that can be eradicated. This publication discusses the international Zero Hunger agenda in light of the achievements of the Fome Zero programme in Brazil. It revisits successful initiatives and discusses current actions, while also critically assessing new and growing challenges to the global food security agenda: obesity and climate change.
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    Meeting
    Ministerial Round Table on Zero Hunger 2018
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    The Asia-Pacific region, despite impressive economic growth in recent decades, is home to 490 million people still suffering from chronic hunger, accounting for 62 percent of undernourished people in the world. Stunting of children remains a serious challenge, with the prevalence over 40 percent in several countries. Micronutrient deficiencies are still a major problem in many countries. The trend of childhood obesity is increasing, and the region has about 17 million children under five years of age who are overweight. Thus, the Asia-Pacific region currently is affected by a triple burden of undernourishment, micronutrient deficiencies and obesity. However, ending poverty and hunger by 2030 is feasible. Together with the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP), FAO is committed to achieving Zero Hunger in the context of Sustainable Development Goal 2 (SDG 2) to eliminate hunger and all forms of malnutrition by 2030. As almost 80 percent of the extreme poor live in rural areas, it is therefore necessary to transform the rural economy and to empower small-scale and family farmers as critical agents of change in order to achieve Zero Hunger. This document describes the background to, the objectives of and the agenda for the Ministerial Round Table, held on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 in Nadi, Fiji at APRC 34.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Mountain agriculture: Opportunities for harnessing Zero Hunger in Asia 2019
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    Mountain food security and nutrition are core issues that can contribute positively to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals but paradoxically are often ignored in Zero Hunger and poverty reduction-related agenda. Under the overall leadership of José Graziano da Silva, the Former Director-General of FAO, sustainable mountain agriculture development is set as a priority in Asia and the Pacific, to effectively address this issue and assist Member Countries in tackling food insecurity and malnutrition in mountain regions. This comprehensive publication is the first of its kind that focuses on the multidimensional status, challenges, opportunities and solutions of sustainable mountain agriculture development for Zero Hunger in Asia. This publication is building on the ‘International Workshop and Regional Expert Consultation on Mountain Agriculture Development and Food Security and Nutrition Governance’, held by FAO RAP and UIR in November 2018 Beijing, in collaboration with partners from national governments, national agriculture institutes, universities, international organizations and international research institutes. The publication provides analysis with evidence on how mountain agriculture could contribute to satisfying all four dimensions of food security, to transform food systems to be nutrition-sensitive, climate-resilient, economically-viable and locally adaptable. From this food system perspective, the priority should be given to focus on specialty mountain product identification (e.g. Future Smart Food), production, processing, marketing and consumption, which would effectively expose the potential of mountain agriculture to contribute to Zero Hunger and poverty reduction. In addition, eight Asian country case studies not only identify context-specific challenges within biophysical-technical, policy, socio-economic and institutional dimensions,

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