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Nutrition country profile: Somalia 2005








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    Document
    FAO Strategy in Somalia & Plan of Action 2011-2015 2017
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    Somalia is one of the poorest countries in the world. Torn by a twenty – year long civil war, suffering the absence of a functioning national state, enduring climate-driven and manmade natural disasters and degraded natural recourse base, the country’s human development state is in disarray. Food insecurity and threatened livelihoods are pervasive, especially in the South Central region, the physical and economic infrastructure destroyed, delivery of public goods absent or very limited and massi ve internal and external migration has taken place with large numbers of Internally Displaced Persons. In this very challenging context, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations set off to formulate its Strategy for 2011-2015 that will be operationalized by rolling Plans of Actions. The overarching objective of the FAO Strategy is to improve livelihoods and food security in Somalia. The Strategy is articulated around the following six strategic components which constitute the entry points for engagement in Somalia, identified by a series of participatory problem-identification and analysis workshops and in close consultation with national and external stakeholders. I. Increasing and stabilizing agricultural production and productivity and rural families’ incomes II. Improving profitable and sustainable utilization of livestock resources III. Sustainable fishing for increased incomes of fishing communities and fishermen IV. Managing natural resources for recovery and sustainable use V. Supporting Public/Private Partnerships and local institutions and groups VI. Improving preparedness The Strategy puts a strong emphasis on fighting poverty as poverty is considered as the main driver of the past and current conflicts. Central to this emphasis is the understanding of the socio-economic impact of poverty on the lives of Somali men and women. Agriculture (and livestock)-led growth, complemented by incomegenerating activities and diversification, is the basis on w hich families’ income will be restored and building back better local economies will rest upon. The principle of building back better calls for a linkage at the early stages of humanitarian responses between short-term humanitarian actions and longer-term development interventions. FAO’s cooperation and coordination with bilateral and multilateral organizations working in Somalia will build on linking short-term humanitarian actions to long-term development ones. The Strategy is therefore based on a holistic cooperative approach that calls for the involvement of a variety of actors and partnerships with the private sector and locally based institutions that over the past years have been the main provider of services to local populations. Traditional knowledge has an important role for the Strategy as it devised, throughout Somali history, natural resource management systems and survival strategies that allowed Somalis to cope with risks and shocks. Future interventions will learn from and be built upon traditional coping and survival strategies.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Africa Report - No. 3 December 2005 2005
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    Eastern Africa Harvesting of the 2005 main season cereal crops is underway in northern parts of the subregion while it has been completed in southern parts. A generally better 2005 harvest compared to 2004 is expected to improve food availability in most countries of the subregion. The overall food situation, however, remains precarious with high malnutrition rates reported in several countries arising from effects of war, displacement and past droughts. In Somalia, below av erage 2005 main “gu” season harvest in the south and an upsurge in civil strife have exacerbated the already precarious food situation. Nearly one million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. The food situation in Sudan is also alarming due to continued conflict and population displacement that have resulted in serious food insecurity, especially in Darfur and southern Sudan. Southern Africa There are delays in planting of main season crops due to inadequate rainfall so far in most countries in the subregion. Food insecurity is worsening during this lean period and nearly 12 million people, mainly in Zimbabwe and Malawi, are in need of emergency food assistance. Shortages of key farm inputs such as seed, fertilizer and draft power are reported in Zimbabwe. High inflation coupled with fuel and transport problems are exacerbating food insecurity. In Malawi, markets continue experiencing escalating prices of maize, the main staple food. So far, co mmercial imports and food aid deliveries have been meagre in spite of the significant amounts pledged by international donors. South Africa’s record maize harvest of 12.4 million tonnes is estimated to result in a potential exportable surplus of about 4.66 million tonnes, more than enough to cover the subregion’s import requirements. Western Africa Good harvests are expected in the Sahel, following generally favourable weather conditions throughout the growing season. Howeve r, the severe food crisis that hit the subregion in 2004/05 had serious income, livelihoods and nutrition effects and resulted in depletion of household assets including animals, as well as high levels of indebtedness, notably in Niger and parts of Burkina Faso, Mali and Mauritania. In spite of the improved food supply situation in these countries, assistance is still needed for income generating and asset reconstitution activities in order to strengthen access to food for vulnerable househ olds. In Côte d’Ivoire, insecurity and the de facto partition of the country continue to disrupt agricultural production and marketing activities. In Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, food assistance continues to be needed for internally displaced people and refugees. Central Africa Crop prospects and food security outlook are unfavourable in several countries due mainly to civil strife and insecurity. Overall crop prospects are favourable in Cameroon, but food insecurit y persists in Chari and Logone Division of the Extreme North which experienced a severe food crisis in 2005. The National Early Warning System in Burundi has warned of serious food insecurity beginning December 2005 due to a prolonged dry spell. A similar weather pattern is expected to affect the 2006 A season crops.
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    Nutrition country profile: The Republic of Uganda 2010 2010
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    The Republic of Uganda is a landlocked country of East-central Africa endowed with large fresh-water resources and a high agricultural potential. The population, young and predominantly rural, is mostly engaged in subsistence rain-fed farming. A high population growth rate exerts pressure on the country’s resources. Although poverty is decreasing, it remains widespread, especially in the northern regions. Northern and north-eastern regions of Uganda have experienced severe civil insecurity which resulted in mass displacement of people to Internally Displaced Persons camps. Since 2006, the security situation in northern Uganda has progressively improved; but the situation remains tense in the north-east (Karamoja).

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