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Myanmar | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)











FAO. 2020. Myanmar | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020): Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Rome.



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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Somalia | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
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    Somalia faces the triple threat of COVID-19, desert locusts and ongoing severe floods, with the number of people in severe acute insecurity expected to triple by September since the start of 2020. Against a population of 12.3 million, this amounts to one in every four Somalis facing acute food insecurity at crisis or worse levels and in need of humanitarian assistance due to the combined impact of these newly emerging and past shocks. Somalia had its first reported case of COVID-19 in March 2020 and cases have since continued to rise with 2 696 people infected as of 18 June 2020. Many aspects of life and trade that underpin food security in the country are being disrupted, including food imports, remittances and the livestock sector. The overall impact of COVID-19, including containment measures, are expected to be adverse considering that agriculture accounts for 65 percent of Somalia’s gross domestic product (GDP), while livestock is the second largest contributor; accounting for up to 40 percent of the GDP and more than 50 percent of the export earnings. In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.
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    Mali | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
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    On 25 March 2020, the first cases of COVID-19 were reported in Mali, in a context already marked by a security crisis and where the Government had just declared a state of emergency due to the deteriorating food security and nutrition situation. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, agricultural production in the country was affected by increased conflict caused by armed groups and intercommunity clashes, in the northern and central regions. During the 2017/18 and 2018/19 agricultural seasons, adverse weather conditions also led to large fodder deficits in the Sahelian strip, thus increasing the pressure on fodder resources. Following the first cases of COVID-19 reported in Mali, the Government put in place a series of urgent and essential health‑related containment measures, including border closures, a curfew for two weeks, no gatherings of more than 50 people and closed all schools. While market activity and movement of goods have not been restricted, logistical constraints and delays have accumulated. For many rural households, the pandemic and related necessary restrictions took place during a key period (April–June) with the harvesting of irrigated rice, the preparation of fields and the return of transhumant herders In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.
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    Myanmar - Interim Humanitarian Response Plan 2018
    FAO in the 2018 humanitarian appeals
    2018
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    In Rakhine State, the situation deteriorated dramatically in late 2017. After a series of armed attacks on border guard police posts in northern Rakhine, violence led to mass displacement, including 688 000 people who have sought refuge in Bangladesh since 25 August. Since 2012, violence has resulted in the internal displacement of 241 000 people across the country. The humanitarian situation is characterized by a complex combination of vulnerability to natural disasters, food insecurity, poor nutrition, armed conflict, inter-communal tensions, statelessness, displacement, trafficking and risky migration.

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