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Farming in a changing climate










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    Inland small-pelagic fisheries utilization options, marketing and opportunities for support 2012
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    The fisheries sector contributes greatly to the economies of the eastern, central and southern regions of Africa (ECSA) in terms of income, employment and export revenue. Until recently, only large-sized fish were exploited for human consumption but small-sized pelagic fish were used for animal feed production. However, in the last decade, concerted efforts have been made in various African countries to reverse the trend. For example in 2005, an FAO led study assessed post-harvest losses in one of the abundant small-sized pelagic fisheries (Rastrineobola argentea), in the East Africa states of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. In 2011, Uganda through the Department of Fisheries Resources (DFR), requested FAO under the Technical Corporation Programme (TCP) to address the question of high post-harvest losses in the fishery and improvement of upstream handling against a backdrop of declining per capita consumption trends. Under this programme, several products were developed to increase Rastrin eobola argentea, locally called Mukene, for human consumption. The SMARTFISH Programme, with funding from the European Union (EU) built on previous efforts by initiation of the present study that has been designed to look at increased utilization options to enhance cross-border trade in small pelagics. As a test case, products from Brycinus nurse (Ragoge) and Neobola bredoi (Musiri) commonly found in Lake Albert of Uganda were developed together with potential Ugandan processors and the economic ally viable products were marketed in neighbouring Kenya and Rwanda to gauge their marketability. Using a structured questionnaire with some input from the Trade Event Specialist, some potential regional traders tasked to evaluate their prospects. Prior to product development, information was gathered on all aspects of the Musiri and Ragoge fishery, including the sanitary status of fishing vessels, time of capture, daily catches, drying surfaces, storage facilities, packaging, wholesale operatio ns as well as markets and transportation. The sand-free sundried products, powdered and fried products were promoted for regional markets. As a complementary study, the nutrient content of products from both fish species was determined for purposes of backstopping the three up-graded processors who were at different levels of development. The regional market opportunities surveyed indicated that there was an insatiable demand for all products made from small-sized pelagics ranging from sun-dried to powdered. The large quantities demanded by the regional markets could not be met by processors using traditional processing methods and operating at a small-scale. It was also evident that product quality was a determinant factor in product pricing. The cost of sand-free products was one and a half times more than adulterated products which underscore the influence of consumers in the market place. There were other external drivers that are likely to enhance regional trade of the identified value-added products from Uganda. They included population increases, regional geo-economic and political blocks, carbohydrate-based diets, nutritional properties of fish and civil strife or wars. During the implementation of the present study, there were two major challenges namely; seasonality of the two species under scrutiny and the competence of local processors to be up-graded to standards required by the regional as well as international markets. Both factors slowed down the implementatio n process because unplanned exposure visits and training had to be conducted to improve the competence of potential processors under the up-grading SMARTFISH scheme. In conclusion, there was an insatiable demand in the region for all products made from small-sized pelagic fishes from Uganda and trade in such products can be enhanced in the region with concerted effort from all key actors along the value-chain, improved upstream handling, broadened utilization base, consumption campaigns and enfo rcement of quality and safety standards. However, implementation of some intervention measures cited would require harmonized policies across national borders, substantial investment in the sector, sensitization of key actors with regard to market requirements and goodwill among policy enforcers at border crossings.
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    African Network on Fish Technology and Safety 2021 - Book of abstracts, 6–9 December 2021 / Réseau africain sur la technologie et la sécurité sanitaire du poisson 2021 - Recueil de résumés, 6-9 Décembre 2021 2022
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    This publication includes the abstracts of the selected papers presented by experts on the occasion of the African Network on Fish Technology and Safety (ANFTS) 2021. The abstracts are subdivided according to the following themes: (a) Reduction and prevention of post-harvest losses by: (i) Improving methods, means and the political and institutional environment conducive to good practices for handling, preservation, processing and packaging of fishery products; (ii) Better utilizing low value fish, bycatch and discards; (iii) Developing by-products; (b) Improving fishery products safety by strengthening inspection and quality control services and systems, certification, eco-labelling, etc.; (c) Improving national, sub-regional marketing channels and international trade of fish and fishery products; (d) Socio-economics, gender and environmental issues related to post-harvest activities; and (e) Addressing the implications of COVID-19 on small-scale fishery value chains. Cette publication inclue les résumés des articles sélectionnés présentés par les experts à l’occasion de la réunion du Réseau africain sur la technologie et la sécurité sanitaire du poisson (ANFTS) en 2021. Les résumés sont sous-divisés selon les thèmes suivants: (a) réduction et la prévention des pertes après capture par: (i) l'amélioration des méthodes, des moyens et de l'environnement politique et institutionnel propice aux bonnes pratiques de manipulation, conservation, transformation et conditionnement des produits de la pêche; (ii) une meilleure utilisation des poissons de faible valeur, des prises accessoires et des rejets; (iii) la création de sous-produits; (b) l’amélioration de la sécurité sanitaire des produits de la pêche en renforçant les services et les systèmes d'inspection et de contrôle de la qualité, la certification, l'éco-étiquetage; (c) l’amélioration des circuits de commercialisation nationaux, sous-régionaux et du commerce international du poisson et des produits de la pêche; (d) les questions socioéconomiques relatives à la parité hommes-femmes et à l’environnement, liées aux activités après capture; (e) la prise en compte des implications de la covid-19 sur les chaînes de valeur de la pêche artisanale.
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    Book (series)
    Post-harvest practices for empowering women in small-scale fisheries in Africa
    Successful outcomes and guidance
    2022
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    Post-harvest challenges faced by small-scale fisheries stakeholders have been the focus of numerous projects, programmes and investments in Africa. Many of these initiatives have aimed to benefit women, who often dominate processing and trade activities. This report provides a summary of key findings from a desk review and primary data research that has aimed to identify successful post-harvest initiatives related to infrastructure design and management, improved post-harvest technology, value addition and access to finance. The examples described could be used by development practitioners and policy makers to inform the direction, design and implementation of future post-harvest fisheries initiatives. The use of locally made fish boxes to improve on board handling and the use of drying racks are described. And although the intention was to focus on small-pelagic fish value chains, some of the examples have a more general application such as those for infrastructure, value addition and the microfinance models that are included. It is important to note that this is not a definitive study and that the focus has been primarily on initiatives is Ghana, Malawi, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tanzania and Uganda. The report and guidance align with and aim to support the implementation of the FAO Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines). The guidelines promote the role of SSFs in food security and nutrition, the right to adequate food, equitable development and poverty alleviation, and to the provision of decent work for fishers and fish workers.

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