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Alternative food and feed products

The First FAO/WHO/AU International Food Safety Conference Addis Ababa, 12-13 February 2019















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    Book (stand-alone)
    Improved production systems as an alternative to shifting cultivation
    FAO Soils Bulletin No. 53
    1984
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    Shifting cultivation, under its diverse forms of slash and burn system, is a traditional method of cultivating tropical upland soils, mostly for subsistence purposes. This traditional system of cultivation is in ecological balance with the environment and does not irreversibly degrade the soil resource, provided a sufficient length of fallow is allowed for soil restoration. However, increasing population pressures necessitate more intensive use of land. The consequence is extended cropping perio ds and shortened fallows. In the extreme, short fallow periods are no longer adequate to restore the soil?s productive capacity. The present set of papers is the result of an expert consultation on the subject. The object of the consultation was to provide guidelines for future activities and policy decisions in this subject area. The ultimate objective is to provide feasible alternatives for improving these practices or replacing them with systems of permanent cropping.
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    Book (series)
    Carryover in feed and transfer from feed to food of unavoidable and unintended residues of approved veterinary drugs
    Report of the Joint FAO/WHO expert meeting – 8–10 January 2019, FAO Headquarters, Rome, Italy
    2019
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    Carryover of veterinary drugs in feed can occur during feed processing, handling, transportation, delivery or in feeding animals on-farm. The risk of unavoidable and unintentional veterinary drug residues from feed carryover and/or transfer from feed to food of animal origin is unacceptable when it causes adverse health effects in target and/or non-target animals and/or humans consuming food originating from these animals. If carryover is not properly managed, contaminated feed can directly harm species that are sensitive to the unintended veterinary drug they consume, and /or can result in residues in food of animal origin such as meat, milk and eggs that render them unsafe for human consumption. Even if residues are not a safety hazard, they can pose regulatory and global trade issue as countries/markets may enforce a “zero” tolerance for residues when appropriate maximum residue limits have not been established. Upon request of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods (CCRVDF), FAO and WHO convened an Expert Meeting to review the causes of veterinary drug carryover in animal feed and the transfer from feed to food, as well as the known risks to human health and international trade, and suggest appropriate risk management strategies. This report shows the results of the expert discussions, conclusions and recommendations.
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    Booklet
    Ethiopia | Availability and utilization of agroindustrial by-products as animal feed | 2018 2019
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    One of the major constraints for the very low production and productivity of livestock in Ethiopia is the poor quality and inadequate quantity of available feed. Agro-industrial by-products (AIBPs) can play an important role in meeting the widely prevalent feed shortage in the country. The AIBPs are usually less fibrous, rich in energy and/or protein contents. They have high digestibility and energy values compared with other classes of feed resources. The major AIBPs produced in Ethiopia include by-products from flour millings, sugar factories, edible oil processing factories, breweries, and abattoirs. These by-products play a vital role in the feeding of livestock mainly in urban and peri-urban livestock systems. The spatial and temporal availability of AIBPs in different parts of Ethiopia has not been quantified. Information on the utilization of such resources is also scanty. Data on availability of these resources is important for developing and using appropriate feeding strategies, improving livestock production and productivity, enhancing the efficiency of AIBPs utilization, decreasing burden on the environment and promoting technologies that further circular economy. This study was aimed at assessing the spatial and temporal availability of major AIBPs and their use as livestock feed. Information on storage and transport of these by-products has also been recorded with the aim to identify ‘hotspots’ at which the wastage takes place, and to suggest ways to reduce it.

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