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Traditional knowledge and uses of medicinal plants in Jharkhand state of India

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Use of traditional knowledge in sustainable forest management and provisioning of ecosystem services in Jharkhand, India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Before Scientific knowledge on forest management, local and indigenous communities living in and around forests managed forest and associated landscapes managed forests in such a way which conserved forests and ecosystem, sustained their livelihood and culture. The tribals and other rural people residing in and around forest areas of Jharkhand, an eastern state of India, have their own traditional knowledge (TK) which they acquired by experience during sustainable use of natural resources. Hence such knowledge has the potential value for sustainable forest management, biodiversity conservation and provisioning of Ecosystem services. Traditional Knowledge encompasses a profound belief system associated with ecosystem, livelihoods, ethno medicinal practices, use of natural resources etc. and pass from generation to generation through legends, folk stories, folk songs etc. A study was carried out to know trajectories of SFM development and the role of the TK for SFM in Jharkhand, India. The study reflects that these TK are associated with practices like conservation through Sacred Grove, celebrating festivals based on the nature, taboos, social belief and various other practices which have been helpful in SFM. But in the contemporary globalization and commercialization, there is risk of erosion of such TK. Hence their documentation is necessary. Documentation of data related to traditional use of medicinal plants and other NTFPs like Lac, Silk, and Bamboo etc. for livelihood were done involving three major steps. These are – identification of medicinal plants and other NTFPs used for livelihood and other purposes, documentation of traditional uses and traditional knowledge associated with these NTFPs, and finally exploring how TK and scientific knowledge can be harmonized for SFM. Government policy in India and Jharkhand in this regard has brought about radical changes. With the adoption of Resolution related to Join Forest Management, enactment of Forest Right Act 2006, and implementing Forest Working plan Code 2014 by Government, there has been a perceptible change in approach towards assimilation of TK in SFM. The paper also presents how such knowledge and practices can be helpful in provisioning of ecosystem services. Keywords: Ecosystem services, Jharkhand, SFM, TK ID: 3476942
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    NTFPs as a source of livelihood and climate change mitigation & adaptation: a case study from Jharkhand, India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    There is an inextricable link between forest resources and livelihood of rural people .The rural people including tribals – Oraon, Munda, Ho, Savar, Santhal, Birhor, Bhumij etc. living around forest area use these non-timber forest produce (NTFP) as their primary source of income, food, nutrition, and medicine. NTFPs may be used for subsistence or for sale, providing cash income and function as an economic buffer in times of hardships. The paper summarizes activities of livelihood based on NTFPs in Jharkhand .They get employment in activities related to NTFPs like plucking of Tendu leaves (Diospyros sps.), rearing of Silk- (Antheraea mylitta Drury) and cultivation of Lac- (Kerria lacca Kerr), making of fancy items from bamboo and cottage industry based on bamboo. Of these NTFPs, Lac and Silk occupy an important place in rural economy. Lac, which is a natural resin secreted by an insect, Kerria lacca (Kerr.), cultivated on host trees like Palas [Butea monosperma (Lam.) Taub] and Kusum [Schleichera oleosa (Lour.) Oken] .In Jharkhand mostly Tassar Silk is reared which is produced by a wild silkworm of Antheraea mylitta Drury which feeds primarily on host trees like Asan [Terminalia tomentosa (DC) Wt. &Arn].The paper depicts activities of crafts based on bamboo, embroidery on silk cloth and manufacture of decorative items of Lac and other facets of these NTFPs and their contribution in improving earnings of rural people. The paper also critically examines how NTFPs can be effective tool in climate change mitigation and adaptation especially in REDD+. Hence NTFPs are of importance for food security, livelihood option, poverty eradication and for their role in climate change mitigation and adaption. Government policy in India and Jharkhand related to Join Forest Management, enactment of Forest Right Act 2006, and implementing Forest Working plan Code 2014 by, has brought about radical changes in approach towards management of NTFPs. Keywords: Adaptation, Climate Change, Livelihood, NTFP ID: 3486213
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    Enhancing economic agro-forestry for livelihood opportunity via ecosystem restoration: A case study
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Meghalaya, a North Eastern state of India with its economy tied to natural resource-base and climate- sensitive sectors as agriculture, water, forestry. Encroachment of forest land for agricultural activity, overexploitation of biodiversity, unsustainable agricultural practices (slash & burn) and non-scientific mining resulted in habitat degradation and pollution. India Water Foundation, as development partner with Meghalaya Basin Development Authority (MBDA) under Integrated Basin Development Livelihood Program designed on Knowledge Management, Natural resource Management, Entrepreneurship Development and Good Governance through demand driven partnership madeefforts towards Ecosystem restoration, linking forest, agriculture and water as most of economic value depends on nature and its services. Forest plays an indispensable role to conserve ecological balance and biodiversity restoration and indigenous people worship sacred groves, preserve flora and fauna biodiversity and bamboo reserves dedicated to deities in Garo, Khasi and Jaintia hills served as water catchments to fulfil domestic, agricultural, customary needs. Green Mission promoted protection of catchments forests, improved forest & water foot print, diversified farmer's livelihood, income and food security. Opportunities from social to economic forestry prospered state's economy. Adapting to temperature and weather conditions, entrepreneurs cultivated tea, fruits, flowers, spices and medicinal plants & had market linkages, connectivity, cold storages and financial inclusion. Climate resilient practices like re-wilding, adaptive management augmented sustainable green cover and restored water-land-biomass balance, promoted carbon sequestration and water-energy-food security nexus. Keywords: Biodiversity conservation, Sustainable forest management, Deforestation and forest degradation, Gender, Economic Development ID: 3486365

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