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Forest dependence for meeting household energy demands in Sharavathi Wildlife Sanctuary, Karnataka, India: Constraints and prospects

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Assessment of the Ugandan commercial timber plantation resource and markets for its products
    Summary
    2021
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    Forests are critical resources in Uganda, providing numerous benefits, including the most common forms of energy; charcoal and firewood (nine in every ten households in Uganda use fuelwood for cooking). Forests Uganda’s forest estate comprises both natural forests and commercial timber plantations, with demand for forest products from the latter, estimated at 300 000 cubic metres per year (m3/ year). The current demand for wood products (locally and in the region) greatly exceeds the current supply; although supply is expected to grow tremendously in the next five to ten years. Increase in supply of forest products from commercial forest plantations in Uganda is attributed in part to the technical guidance and the financial assistance of the Sawlog Production Grant Scheme (SPGS), which has supported establishment of commercial forest plantations over the last 15 years. FAO is implementing Phase III of SPGS, among whose objective is to address a critical gap in the forestry value chain- the development of knowledge and expertise relating to the processing of logs produced by the timber plantations. Phase III also focuses on development of markets (domestic, regional and global) for wood products as well as resource supply and market demand. Previous phases of SPGS focused mainly on establishment of quality plantations. There is no formal record of the extent of the commercial forestry estate in Uganda and an analysis of existing and potential markets has been difficult. FAO therefore conducted a study to: 1) Estimate the extent of the timber plantation resource; 2) Characterize the timber that the commercial plantations will yield in the next 10 years; and 3) Assess the markets and demand for forest products from timber plantations.
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    Article
    Promoting Terminalia brownii as a commercial indigenous tree species in drylands, East Africa
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Kenya’s forest cover is estimated at 7.4% of the land mass cover. Forests are important in ensuring biodiversity conservation and providing ecosystem goods and services, improving community livelihoods and national GDP. There is need to enhance afforestation and reforestation programmes to achieve the envisioned 10% tree cover target. However, this effort is constrained by climate change issues arising from unsustainable exploitation of wood for charcoal and firewood leading to the depletion of important tree species such as T. brownii. The domestication of T. brownii under agroforestry systems and other tree planting programmes are constrained by lack of adequate supply of superior and high quality seeds and seedlings, poor silvi-cultural management techniques, low rates of integration into smallholder agroforestry programs, limited knowledge on crop-tree interactions and lack of allometric models to estimate biomass yield and carbon stock. A multidisciplinary research project funded by the National Research Fund (NRF) is ongoing and is geared towards promoting the propagation and regeneration of T. brownii under agroforestry systems in the drylands of Kenya to mitigate climate change. A number of preliminary findings have been reported, such are; (1) Terminalia brownii fruits have mechanical dormancy imposed by the hard samara fruit and that extracted T. brownii seeds record a high percentage of above 80% under warm conditions; (2) germination of T. brownii fruits and seeds are significantly affected by fungal pathogens and insect pests; (3) five variables significantly influence the decision to domesticate T. brownii these are; education level of household head, importance of farm to the household income, access to credit, dependency ratio and intercropping; (4) studies on the spatial distribution and occurrence and development of allometric equation for estimating above and below-ground biomass of T. brownii in the drylands of Kenya are ongoing. Further assessment on growth performance have shown that T. brownii is generally fast growing; can attain an increase in height of (~1.0 m) and DGL (3.0 cm) annually, with significance difference in growth within and between provenances and that the it can withstand many other growth challenges despite the harsh weather conditions. These findings suggest that T. brownii is a promising tree species in agroforestry systems and afforestation in drylands and that there exist genetic variability among the available provenances thus the need to involve more stakeholders in seedling production and to embark on...... Key words: T. brownii, Commercial tree, growth performance, drylands of Kenya ID: 3623166
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    Article
    Tree diversity, stand structure and community composition of tropical forests in Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary of Jharkhand, India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Species diversity and density of trees were assessed in forests of Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary of Jharkhand comprising mostly of tropical deciduous forests. We compared tree community characteristics like stem density, basal area, diversity index, Beta(β diversity), Girth class, Canopy height class and species composition of tree species in all three zones ( Altitude between 199 -603m) in the study area. A total of 41 tree species of 25 families, 71 genera, and 95 species were recorded. Gramineae (10) family is most represented followed by Euphorbiaceae(6). It was noticed that the tree density varied from 30.64 to 62.51. The maximum basal area contributed by Terminalia belerica(1.323 m2ha-1) followed by Albezzia stipulate(1.145 m2ha-1). Shannon Weiner index (H’) ranged from 3.073 to 3.997 and species richness index ranged from 1.05 to 1.20. Beta diversity of tree species varied from 2.32 to 3.80. The highest number of tree species was occurred in girth class of 61 – 80 cm in all three zones. At present the biodiversity of these forests are under threat due to the anthropogenic and illegal interference of outside people for cutting of furniture tree species. The present study will help us to understand the patterns of tree species composition and diversity in the Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary, of India. Keywords; Species diversity, Beta diversity, Basal area, Girth class, Canopy height and Species composition. ID: 3469677

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