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Gender, food security and nutrition in protracted crises










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    Booklet
    Meeting fuel and energy needs in protracted crises 2016
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    This note focuses on the topic of access to fuel and energy in protracted crises, and the possible solutions using the SAFE approach, illustrated by case studies from FAO's interventions in protracted crisis situations. Access to fuel and energy – vital for food security – is often highly constrained in protracted crises. The risks posed by limited access to fuel and energy are multiple and diverse depending on the context, including malnutrition, environmental degradation, a high work burden fo r women, gender-based violence (GBV) and unsustainable livelihood activities. The inter-agency Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) initiative and FAO’s work on SAFE address the multi-sectoral challenges associated with energy and contribute to resilience-building in protracted crises. They also make a contribution to a number of principles in the Committee on Food Security Framework for Action (CFS-FFA). This guidance note draws on FAO experience and lessons learned to support FAO staff and st rategic partners in addressing energy access as part of food and nutrition security interventions in situations of protracted crisis. Its purpose is to contribute to the implementation of the CFS-FFA principles and demonstrate that understanding and responding to fuel and energy needs and related risks are critical for effective and sustainable food and nutrition security interventions in protracted crises.
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    Booklet
    Nutrition in protracted crises 2016
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    This note focuses on the topic of nutrition in protracted crises. While malnutrition is one of the biggest challenges to development and human well-being in many countries, rates of malnutrition, especially stunting, are significantly higher in countries in the throes of protracted crises. Malnutrition and crises go hand in hand: malnutrition both impacts on and is affected by crises. Protracted Crises impact negatively on people’s lives and livelihoods and the factors responsible for malnutriti on: food insecurity, inappropriate care and feeding practices, poor health environment. Nutrition needs to be integrated in resilience-building programmes to support a people-centred approach and build a bridge between short-term crisis management and longer-term development. Malnutrition cannot be tackled by one sector alone and needs multi-sectoral and multi-stakeholder solutions. Synergies can be promoted between partners and coordination mechanisms working on food security, nutrition and res ilience for an integrated food security and nutrition response. The aim of this paper is to illustrate – including through case studies - how FAO’s work in nutrition plays a prominent role to support the CFS Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis situations.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Gender equality for resilience in protracted crises 2017
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    The webinar on gender equality for resilience in protracted crises was presented as part of a series of webinars organized between May and December 2016 by KORE - the Knowledge sharing platform on resilience- within the INFORMED programme and dedicated to sharing knowledge on resilience building. This series of webinars is the result of a collaboration between EU-DEVCO and FAO strategic programme on resilience. The objective is to improve the food security and nutrition of populations affected b y, or at risk of, protracted crises by addressing critical manifestations and building resilience; adapting to specific challenges; and contributing to addressing underlying causes. Among the 11 principles, there is a specific principle on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls.

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