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The CELAC Plan for Food and Nutrition Security and the Eradication of Hunger 2025. Executive Summary








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    Book (stand-alone)
    CELAC Plan for food security, nutrition and the eradication of hunger 2030
    Time is action
    2024
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    The CELAC plan for food security, nutrition and the eradication of hunger 2030 consists of three chapters. The first presents the context and trends that affect food security and nutrition in Latin America and the Caribbean, organized into four pillars, i) Strengthen legal and institutional frameworks and macroeconomic and trade policies for the coordination and implementation of food security and nutrition plans, policies and programmes with a gender and ethnic-racial focus and human rights perspective, in particular the Right to Adequate Food; ii) Promote sustainable production, food supply and physical and economic access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious foods for all people, especially those in more vulnerable situations, with cultural and territorial relevance; iii) Guarantee the affordability and consumption of healthy diets for the entire population, especially those in more vulnerable situations, while ensuring respect for the diversity of diets and food culture; iv) Promote sustainable and resilient agrifood systems to address climate change, protect biodiversity, efficiently use natural resources, and provide timely assistance to the population in the face of extreme climate events and natural disasters that may affect the availability of food. It also has 15 lines of action and 142 action measures proposed. The second focuses on financing and the instruments for its implementation, such as the regional platform of the CELAC for 2030. The third is related to monitoring and the proposed indicators for the analysis of the results, including their contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals and the additional objectives agreed by the countries.
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    Book (series)
    2015 Regional Overview of Food Insecurity Latin America and the Caribbean: The Region has reached the international hunger targets 2015
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    In the last two decades, food and nutritional security have become an integral part of the political agenda of Latin America and the Caribbean, and the eradication of hunger and malnutrition is now a regional development objective. In 1990-92, Latin America and the Caribbean began the challenge of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) with 14.7% of its population affected by hunger. By 2014-16 this prevalence has fallen to 5.5% and the region has achieved the MDG hunger goal. The region also m et the goal of the World Food Summit (WFS) established in 1996, having reduced the total number of people suffering hunger to 34.3 million. Poverty has also declined from 2002 onwards, from 44% to 28%, although extreme poverty has risen in the last two years.
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    Book (series)
    The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2009
    Economic crises – impacts and lessons learned
    2009
    The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2009 presents the latest statistics on global undernourishment and concludes that structural problems of underinvestment have impeded progress toward the World Food Summit goal and the first Millennium Development Goal hunger reduction target. This disappointing state of affairs has been exacerbated by first the food crisis and now the global economic crisis that, together, have increased the number of undernourished people in the world to mo re than one billion for the first time since 1970. The report describes the transmission channels through which the economic crisis has affected developing countries and presents a series of country case studies that show how the poor are struggling to cope with a severe shock that is not of their own making. This crisis is different from the crises developing countries have experienced in the past, because it is affecting the entire world simultaneously, because it comes on top of a food crisis that has already strained the coping mechanisms of the poor, and because developing countries today are more integrated into the global economy than in past decades. In the context of the enormous financial pressures faced by governments, the twin-track approach remains an effective way to address growing levels of hunger in the world. Stepping up investment in the agriculture sector, especially for public goods, will be critical if hunger is to be eradicated. In additio n, safety nets designed to protect the most poor and food-insecure are an essential complement to such investment because the poorest should be given the opportunity to feed themselves now, even if the full impact of longer-term investment has not yet been realized.

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