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Tracking progress on food and agriculture-related SDG indicators 2021: A report on the indicators under FAO custodianship











FAO. 2021. Tracking progress on food and agriculture-related SDG indicators 2021: A report on the indicators under FAO custodianship. Rome.




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    Book (stand-alone)
    Tracking progress on food and agriculture-related SDG indicators 2023 2023
    At the mid-point of the Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development, there is an urgent need to understand where the world stands in eliminating hunger and food insecurity, as well as in ensuring sustainable agriculture. The new report of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), titled Tracking progress on food and agriculture-related SDG indicators, offers analysis and trends on indicators across eight Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – in particular, SDGs 1, 2, 5, 6, 10, 12, 14 and 15 – highlighting areas of progress and areas where further effort is needed. Available in digital format, this year’s edition also discusses selected indicators for which FAO is a contributing agency and/or that have key implications for food and agriculture. These additional indicators provide valuable information on agricultural losses resulting from disasters, the distribution of land tenure rights, the prevalence of stunting and malnutrition, the impact of international trade policies and regulations on agricultural trade, especially in developing and least developed countries, and the proportion of land degradation.This edition also includes, for the first time, an overall statistical progress assessment for SDG 2 that synthesizes information across all indicators aimed at achieving Zero Hunger, including those for which FAO is not the custodian agency.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Tracking progress on food and agriculture-related SDG indicators 2022 2022
    Seven years into the 2030 Agenda, there is an urgent need to understand where the world stands in eliminating hunger and food insecurity, as well as in ensuring sustainable agriculture. FAO's new report, “Tracking progress on food and agriculture-related SDG indicators”, offers analysis and trends on indicators across eight SDGs (1, 2, 5, 6, 10, 12, 14 and 15), highlighting areas of progress and areas where further effort is needed.Available in digital format, this year’s edition also discusses selected indicators for which FAO is a contributing agency and/or have key implications for food and agriculture across these Goals. These additional indicators provide valuable information on agricultural losses due to disasters, the distribution of land tenure rights, and the impact of international trade policies and regulations on agricultural trade, especially in developing and Least Developed Countries. This edition also includes a snapshot on conflict, COVID-19 and food insecurity, as well as a special chapter on measuring productive and sustainable agriculture, with progress toward SDG Target 2.4 analysed for the first time.Last update 04/10/2022
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    Social protection responses to food price shocks 2022
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    The significant rise in food prices, together with soaring fuel and fertilizer prices, is an additional threat, on top of the damage already caused by COVID-19 and prior increases in hunger and malnutrition, to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The poor and vulnerable are those most affected by the increase in food prices. We, representatives of UN system agencies, other multilateral and bilateral development agencies, donor governments, and civil society observers that make up the Social Protection Inter-Agency Cooperation Board (SPIAC-B), are committed to the realization of SDG targets 1.3 (social protection systems for all), 2.1 (end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situation), 3.8 (universal health coverage), and 10.4 (achieve greater equality). We call for social protection to be placed at the heart of national and international responses to the high food price crisis and for massively increasing efforts to achieve universal access to social protection by 2030.

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