Thumbnail Image

Enabling Sustainable Production Landscapes in the Eastern Highlands and Western Highlands Provinces for Biodiversity, Human Livelihoods and Well-Being









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    Mapping territorial markets in Chimbu province and in Eastern Highlands province, Papua New Guinea
    Summary report
    2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Smallholder farmers are responsible for most of the food consumed in the world, as well as most of the investments made in agriculture. They operate largely in a range of local and national markets that are embedded in territorial food systems, also known as “territorial markets”. From a consumer perspective, these markets serve as key retail outlets for access to the foods needed for healthy diets, in particular fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, meat and staple foods. Despite their importance however, data concerning territorial markets – such as the availability of food groups, food retailers and consumer profiles – are not often included in national data collection systems. As a result, they are often neglected in strategies aimed at improving nutrition, reducing poverty and fostering local economies. This booklet presents data and results from the mapping territorial markets in Chimbu and Eastern Highlands provinces, Papua New Guinea.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Yonki fisherfolk: report of a survey among people fishing at Yonki Reservoir, upper Ramu River, Eastern Highlands Province
    Sepik River Fish Stock Enhancement Project: PNG/85/001. Field Document No. 19
    1993
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In January 1991 the dam built for electric power generation at Yonki township in the upper Ramu was closed. This started the flooding of grasslands, gardens and coffee plantations in the Arona Valley. In November 1991 the reservoir, which is at 1260 meters above sea level, reached the Full Supply Level and water started to flow over the spill way. At this level the reservoir covers an area of 2200 hectares. The shoreline of the reservoir is very dendritic and has an approximate length of 50 to 6 0 km. The new reservoir is the biggest water body in the high altitude region (i.e. > 1000 m above sea level) of the Sepik-Ramu catchment area. According to the 1990 National Population Census 9179 people live in census units within approximately 6 km from the reservoir, of which 2631 live in Yonki Township. Figure 1 shows a map of the reservoir with Yonki township and some of the nearby villages.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    The role of bamboo forest in balancing and sustaining the development of local livelihood and human well-being in rural areas of Vietnam
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The balanced maintenance between forest development, human health, and well-being is the key to sustainable forest landscape management. My research aims to find out the current status of that relationship in Muong Hinh community (North-Central Vietnam) with the focus on lung bamboo forest - the vital natural resource of local communities. Lung bamboo (Bambusa longissima sp.nov) is an endemic species of Vietnam and is considered a strategic species for development in rural areas. However, due to the over-exploitation and unplanned management, the lung bamboo forests have been remarkably degraded and are even at risk of being depleted. Muong Hinh, currently, has 712 ha of lung bamboo forests and the payment from lung bamboo harvesting is the most important income for the local dwellers. However, it does not meet the local needs due to the low price and low added value. Besides, after years of applying wrong harvesting techniques with high harvesting intensity, local people are losing their forest both in terms of the forest area and quality. There is also a lack of knowledge on sustainable bamboo forest management within the community. Based on the current situation, some recommendations are given on essential techniques for sustainably managing and using bamboo forests. Of which, the proper harvesting intensity and the rotation of exploiting areas are the most critical issues. If the local people are going to apply the suggestions, they probably earn about 440 US$/ha/year from their lung bamboo forest (three times higher than their current income), and it could be increased up to 1,200 US$/ha/year shortly. Moreover, there is also a need to have alternative incomes for stable livelihood development. Several options are developing post-harvesting activities or possessing facilities, setting up a lung bamboo value chain, and reasonable collecting of other potential forest products such as timber or NTFPs. Keywords: forestry, lung bamboo forest, forest landscape management, sustainable livelihood development. ID: 3478867

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.