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Women’s empowerment and gender equality in agrifood value chains in SIDS










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    Gender equality and women's empowerment in food and agriculture - Kenya
    Kenya
    2023
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    FAO's Flexible Voluntary Contribution (FVC) is seeking to enhance rural women’s social and economic empowerment and strengthen their leadership roles in rural development, decision-making and resilience building while contributing to the eradication of hunger and extreme poverty. This initiative adopts holistic, integrated and transformative approaches to tackle deep-rooted causes of gender inequalities. It engages both women and men in sensitization, capacity development, dialogue, analysis, and action over gender equality, collective action, local issues and farm business for a better life.
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    Dimitra Clubs: Leaving no one behind through community engagement and women’s empowerment 2023
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    The world is not on track in making the pledge of leaving no one behind a reality, particularly in rural areas where most of the extreme poor live. Rural people in low-income countries increasingly face structural constraints in seizing socio-economic and political opportunities. In addition, gender discriminatory social norms prevent rural women and girls from realizing their full potential as leaders and economic agents, constraining the livelihoods and well-being of entire rural societies. In this context, development and humanitarian actors tend to overlook the use of community engagement and gender-transformative approaches, despite the fact that these are cost effective and have high returns. Considering these pressing challenges, it is of paramount importance to promote collective action at community level – ensuring ownership and sustainability – to trigger transformative changes in terms of gender equality, women’s leadership and social inclusion.
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    Booklet
    Rural Women and Girls 25 years after Beijing: critical agents of positive change 2020
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    Globally, and with only a few exceptions, rural and indigenous women fare worse than rural men and urban women and men on every indicator for which data are available. Although they share challenges in the form of rural location and genderbased discrimination, rural women and girls are not a homogeneous group. The opportunities and constraints they face differ across their lifetimes, contexts and circumstances; they are influenced by location and socio-economic status and social identities associated with other forms of marginalization, such as indigenous origin and ethnicity, age, disability, migrant or refugee status. The complex experiences of rural and indigenous women and girls mean that they commonly face varied and deeply entrenched obstacles to empowerment. It is thus imperative to not only take stock of the broad experiences of rural women and girls, but also to recognize and address the specific needs and distinct realities faced by those constituting these two groups. This document highlights some of the ways in which this can be achieved. This includes good practices from the members of the Inter-Agency Network on Women and Gender Equality in the thematic areas of education; food security and nutrition; health; access to and control over land and other productive resources; leadership, decision-making and public life; social protection and services; care and domestic work; GBV; and resilience in the context of climate change and fragility.

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