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Scientific review of the impact of climate change on plant pests

A global challenge to prevent and mitigate plant-pest risks in agriculture, forestry and ecosystems










Read the summary “Summary for policymakers of the scientific review of the impact of climate change on plant pests" 

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Last updated date 12/01/2022


IPPC Secretariat. 2021. Scientific review of the impact of climate change on plant pests  A global challenge to prevent and mitigate plant pest risks in agriculture, forestry and ecosystems. Rome. FAO on behalf of the IPPC Secretariat.




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    Summary for policymakers of the scientific review of the impact of climate change on plant pests
    A global challenge to prevent and mitigate plant pest risks in agriculture, forestry and ecosystems
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    Climate change represents an unprecedented challenge to the world’s biosphere and to the global community. It also represents a unique challenge for plant health. Human activities and increased market globalization, coupled with rising temperatures, has led to a situation that is favourable to pest movement and establishment. This summary for policy makers drawn from the FAO scientific review on the impact of climate change on plant pests, and by extension, on plant health provides concrete recommendations for decision makers on how to address the impact of climate change on plant health. The evidence assessed strongly indicates that climate change has already expanded some pests’ host range and geographical distribution, and may further increase the risk of pest introduction to new areas. Increased international cooperation and development of harmonized plant protection strategies are crucial to help countries successfully adapt their pest risk management measures to climate change.
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    Plant health and food security 2017
    A fundamental human need for individuals, communities and nations is ongoing access to sufficient, affordable, safe and nutritious food to live an active and healthy life. Pests and diseases of plants pose a threat to food security because they can damage crops, which reduces the availability and increases the cost of food. Pest and disease threats are greater than ever before due to increasing global trade and a changing climate. Both of these create favourable conditions for the movement and spread of plant pests and diseases. It is more essential than ever to protect plants from pests and diseases in order to achieve and sustain food security and sources of income for a growing world. Increased trade and a changing climate create opportunities for new plant pests and diseases to appear where they have not been seen before with potentially devastating effects. The International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) was established in 1952. Its mission - to protect the world’s plants from pests and diseases – means it is well placed to address these challenges and to establish coordinated action against the spread of the pests and diseases that threaten food security.
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    Project
    Enhancing Protection of Plant Resources from Pests in Developing Countries - GCP/GLO/877/EC 2023
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    Due to rapid globalization, international travel and trade are greater than ever before, and as people and commodities move around the world, organisms that present risks to plants travel with them. The International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) is an international plant health agreement, which aims to protect cultivated and wild plants by preventing the introduction and spread of pests. Of the 184 IPPC contracting parties, 130 are from developing countries, and there is an increasing demand for technical assistance to improve their capacity to establish and maintain efficient plant protection institutions and framework. Against this background, the European Union funded Implementation Review and Support System (IRSS) project has been operating, since 2012, as the tool used by the IPPC to identify contracting parties’ challenges and opportunities for the implementation of the Convention and International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPMs). This project was implemented to build on the results delivered in the first and second project cycles of the IRSS; and to improve contracting parties’ implementation of the IPPC, ISPMs and Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM) recommendations.

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