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Evaluation of FAO’s work in livestock production, policy and information









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    Document
    Independent evaluation of the workings of the International Plant Protection Convention and its institutional arrangements 2007
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    The International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) is an international treaty relating to plant health, to which as of September 2007 165 governments adhere. The Secretariat for the IPPC is provided by FAO and the Convention is governed by the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM). The WTO agreement on sanitary and phyto-sanitary matters (SPS) recognises the IPPC as the international standard-setting organization for the elaboration of international standards to help ensure that phytosani tary measures are not used as unjustified barriers to trade. Consequently, steps were undertaken to adapt the Convention to the new realities. This resulted in the development of a revised text which extended the Convention’s scope and mandate to include standard-setting, the promotion of the provision of technical assistance, and to address environmental concerns. The new revised text of the IPPC was adopted in 1997 and came into force in October 2005.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Evaluation of FAO’s activities in crop production 2005
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    Ensuring food security and raising farm income levels have been fundamental corporate objectives since the founding of FAO. Activities aimed at increasing and diversifying crop production are therefore of major interest, and numerous requests for assistance in this area are received from FAO’s member countries.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Measuring and modelling soil carbon stocks and stock changes in livestock production systems – A scoping analysis for the LEAP work stream on soil carbon stock changes 2019
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    In order to build consensus on methods to measure and model soil carbon stocks and stock changes, the Steering Committee of the Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership mandated a task force to develop this scoping analysis and pave the way towards the formation of the LEAP Tecnical Advisory Group on soil carbon stock changes. Soil carbon sequestration and storage in grasslands offers a significant potential to compensate for GHG emissions from livestock, but the lack of consensus on the appropriate methodologies to account for soil carbon stock changes hinders robust and standardized assessments. In this report, we reviewed several published soil organic carbon (SOC) models, and evaluated their aptitude to combine them with life cycle assessments (LCAs). Among contentious issues, the most relevant are: a) the lack of universal models, b) the uneven data availability, comparability and quality between countries and regions, and c) the difficulty to match measurable SOC fractions with those determined by the models. Taking this into account, a tiered approach is proposed, according to the availability of original data to run the models. The use of IPCC carbon (C) accounting system appears to be the simplest approach suitable to countries with scarcity of original C data. Conversely, more complex models such as Century (Parton 1987, 1988) or Roth C (Smith 1998) are likely to perform better and give less uncertainty when original input data are easily available.

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