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Development of National Food-Based Dietary Guidelines for Botswana - TCP/BOT/3703








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    Strengthening Inter-Institutional Coordination Mechanisms to Enhance Food Systems - TCP/INS/3703 2021
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    As a middle income country, Indonesia has made tremendous progress in terms of economic development and poverty reduction income growth has reached over 5 percent per year and the prevalence of undernourishment has drastically declined This pace of economic growth has brought with it inevitable changes, such as urbanization (the urban population increased from 49 8 percent in 2010 to 53 3 percent in 2015 and is projected to reach 60 percent in 2025 and dietary transitions (an increased consumption of processed foods with high salt, fat and sugar content), which continue to affect food security, nutrition and the availability of healthy diets Despite the economic growth and improved welfare, stunting in children under five years of age remains above 30 percent (the World Health Organization’s threshold for very high prevalence) and obesity rose by 75 percent between 1990 and 2013 As a member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations ( and a signatory to the declaration by ASEAN Heads of Government to end all forms of malnutrition, Indonesia recognizes that nutrition is a multisectoral issue and requires a systemwide approach for greater political coherence Moreover, Indonesia can benefit from incorporating the lessons learned in other countries that have undergone a similar economic and dietary transition as it seeks to identify, prioritize and design policies and interventions that deliver transformative changes to support the country’s pursuit of SDG 2 ,,“End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture,” as well as the other SDGs An efficient food systems approach can contribute to ensuring the sufficient supply, good storage, and preservation of food, in addition to the reduction of food loss and waste It can also support the distribution of essential nutrients, especially those that are not consumed in adequate quantities, as opposed to only focusing on calories.
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    Support Government in Development and Implementation of the National Food Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDGS) - TCP/KEN/3704 2022
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    Kenya is faced with a double burden of malnutrition, including overnutrition and undernutrition According to the 2014 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey ( 26 percent of children under the age of five are stunted, 4 percent are wasted, and 11 percent are underweight The Kenya STEPwise Survey for Non Communicable Diseases Risk Factors 2015 showed that 28 percent of Kenyans aged 18 to 69 years were either overweight or obese, with the percentage being significantly higher in women 38 5 percent) than men 17 5 percent) In order to address the above mentioned nutrition challenges, the Government of Kenya has committed to embarking on a comprehensive nutrition education and behaviour programme to promote healthy diets and lifestyles As a first step to this, the Government, through the Ministry of Health and other partners, developed the National Guidelines for Healthy Diet and Physical activity, which is expected to culminate in the development of Food Based Dietary Guidelines.
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    Support to Malnutrition Reduciton in Women and Vulnerable Populations through Food-Based Approaches - TCP/GHA/3703 2023
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    In 2019 it was estimated that 5 5 million people in Ghana were malnourished Levels of malnutrition are particularly concerning among children, and are an underlying cause of a third of all child deaths With a national prevalence of stunting at 19 percent (as per the Ghana Demographic and Health Survey 2014 the situation is worrying, especially in the Eastern and Central regions, where anaemia is also prevalent Malnutrition in Ghana is mostly caused by inadequate food intake and a lack of both variety and nutrient rich food in the diet of the population Poor residents in rural areas are particularly vulnerable Although Ghana possesses a diverse range of nutrient rich crops, consumption and utilization of these items are low, due in part to supply chain challenges, socio economic factors and a lack of knowledge and awareness on how to preserve and use nutrient rich food This FAO project seeks to address the challenge of nutritious food consumption in Central, Eastern and Greater Accra regions by promoting the production and consumption of nutrient rich food such as the orange fleshed sweet potato ( and other locally identified crops The OFSP was identified as a key crop for this project, as it contains a high concentration of carotene, which has the potential to improve the nutrition of women, children and other vulnerable groups Its high iron content also makes it effective in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia.

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