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The Kyrgyz Republic: Farm mechanization and agricultural productivity







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    Book (series)
    The Kyrgyz Republic: Farm mechanization and agricultural productivity
    FAO Investment Centre: Country highlights, Paper commissioned under the FAO/WB Cooperative Programme
    2009
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    This policy note reviewed the status of farm machinery in the Kyrgyz Republic. Agricultural productivity, particularly in terms of grain yields, is low because of underinvestment. This note finds that a significant deficit in agricultural machinery is hindering sector productivity. The Kyrgyz Republic has fewer tractors per hectare than any comparable country, with a deficit estimated at 40 percent. The deficit of combine harvesters, estimated at 45 percent, is even more critical. When the age of agricultural machinery is taken into account, the underinvestment becomes even more acute. The reduced domestic production of wheat exacerbates food security concerns.Inadequate access to credit and small farm size are the main factors that constrain farm mechanization. The policy note presents three sets of short- to medium-term policy options to: i) promote the demand for farm machinery, by developing credit lines for agricultural productive assets, leasing, facilit ating access to secondhand equipment, and testing/demonstrating the efficiency of farm machinery for small-scale farming; ii) increase the supply of farm machinery, by facilitating the development of mechanical services contracting and improving access to farm machinery import markets, including for second-hand equipment; and iii) remove obstacles to private investment, by avoiding distributions of farm machinery or inputs in-kind, the setting of production targets for specific cro ps, and ensuring that the private sector is free to fulfill its role.
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    Farm power and mechanization for small farms in sub-Saharan Africa 2006
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    In the past, many of the publications concerned with mechanization, draught animal power, hand-tool technology, etc. tended to be rather mono-topical, dealing with only one aspect of the subject. Farm power and mechanization also tended to be separated from the actual processes of crop production and processing; it was a topic created by engineers and was dealt with by engineers. As a result, there is a widespread lack of understanding of the subject, and there are many widely held mis conceptions with regard to the essential contribution of farm power and mechanization to small farmers’ productivity and livelihoods. In recent years, the Farm Power and Mechanization Group in FAO has broken away from this rather narrow approach and has put the different sources of farm power, mechanization, machinery, equipment and tools into a much broader context. We have looked at farm power from the perspective of rural livelihoods and farming systems, as well as the critical area of labour saving in HIV/AIDS and migrationaffected populations. We have purposely avoided taking rigid positions with regard to any one particular type of technology; instead, we have adopted a much wider brief and have been concerned to identify appropriate solutions for a range of situations.
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    Fish marketing and consumption survey in the Kyrgyz Republic 2013
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    A country-wide survey was carried out to assess the status, trends and issues related to fish production, marketing and consumption in the Kyrgyz Republic. The methodology adopted was a combination of structured questionnaires and one-to-one interviews that collected data from 1167 respondents, which included fish farmers, vendors/sellers of fish and fish products, consumers of fish and fish products and key informants. The emerged trends and issues from the survey results were presented and in terpreted under fish production, trade and consumption. Since independence, the fish production in the Kyrgyz Republic is not realized to its potential due to knowledge gaps in innovative technology and good management practices in aquaculture and fisheries. Inconsistent supply of quality fish seed, lack of access to fish feeds and credit, and total absence of state support services were the main constraints. Farmers see opportunities to develop recreational fisheries in their aquaculture ponds . The main constraints to a developed fish marketing are related to infrastructure and institutional management. The majority of markets are rather poorly endowed with basic infrastructure and services for food handling. Knowledge deficit on modern sanitation techniques and quality control, management of hygiene of fish handlers, and distantly located markets from fishers are also constraints in fish marketing. A vigorous attempt to improve the system should begin by a very careful and detailed evaluation of the problems in the market and marketing system. The quality of unprocessed fish during transit from harvest to the consumer cannot be assured as the present system of inspection and quality control is restricted mainly to the processed fish products. The price of fish is influenced by the price at which the middlemen/wholesalers buy their fish and the amount of profit they intend to gain, and it is fixed through supply and demand interaction. The marketing inefficiency too contri butes to unregulated price margins. In proportion to other commodities, fish prices have recently increased and this discourages increasing per capita fish consumption. The share of fish in the food basket offered by catering entities averages 19 percent, while the share of fish and fish products in the total food basket of a household amounts to less than 9.7 percent. The indications are that to increase this share, fish prices must go down. Fish selling business is dominated by females, mainl y in the post-harvest sector due to their involvement in household-based small-scale fish processing. Exporters perceived that low-interest credit and improved legislation to streamline export procedures, elimination of corruption and access to information, particularly on pricing policies, quality standards, and forecasted fish consumption and demand are key to improve the export industry. The report includes a set of recommendations to address the issues emerged from the survey related to fish production, marketing and consumption.

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