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The State of Food and Agriculture 2015 in brief












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    Book (stand-alone)
    The State of Food and Agriculture 2015 (SOFA): Social Protection and Agriculture: Breaking the Cycle of Rural Poverty 2015
    Despite significant progress in meeting the Millennium Development Goals on poverty and hunger, almost a billion people still live in extreme poverty (less than $1.25 per person per day) and 795 million still suffer from chronic hunger. Much more will have to be done to achieve the new Sustainable Development Goals on eradicating poverty and hunger by 2030. Most of the extreme poor live in rural areas of developing countries and depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. They are so poor and m alnourished that their families live in a cycle of poverty that passes from generation to generation. Many developing countries are adopting a successful new strategy for breaking the cycle of rural poverty – combining social protection and agricultural development. Social protection measures such as cash benefits for widows and orphans and guaranteed public works employment for the poor can protect vulnerable people from the worst deprivation. It can allow households to increase and diversify t heir diets. It can also help them save and invest on their own farms and or start new businesses. Agricultural development programmes that support small family farms in accessing markets and managing risks can create employment opportunities that make these families more self-reliant and resilient. Social protection and agricultural development, working together, can break the cycle of rural poverty.
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    Document
    The Interaction between Social Protection and Agriculture
    A Review of Evidence
    2013
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    Social protection policies aim to reduce socio-economic risks, vulnerability, extreme poverty and deprivation, while smallholder agricultural policies focus on improving productivity in crops, fisheries, forestry and livestock and improving access to markets. Both areas of policy are important in poverty reduction strategies, but little attention has been paid to the interaction between them and how that influences their design and implementation. This study explores the interaction between formal social protection and agriculture by proposing a theory of change and conducting an empirical review that identifies how social protection impacts agricultural production and how agricultural interventions reduce risks and vulnerability at the household and local economy levels. The paper seeks to provide an empirical rationale for building synergies and coordinating complementarities between social protection and smallholder agriculture in developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The review also provides some insights to the FAO and its partners on how social protection and agriculture can potentially complement each other.
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    Project
    Advancing “Healthy Street Food Incentives” to Boost the Safety and Nutritional Balance of Street Food in Sub-Saharan Africa - TCP/RAF/3611 2020
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    Street food vendors (SFVs) have proliferated in the last three and a half decades throughout Africa, owing to ongoing urbanization. On the one hand, this type of work provides a regular source of income for millions of people (mostly women) with limited access to the formal wage labour market; on the other hand, it represents a significant part of the daily diet for millions of low and middle-income urban dwellers who spend long hours out of the house. Despite its important role in securing food and reducing poverty in urban areas across Africa, the sector is largely affected by food safety issues, and it is characterized by an overwhelming presence of carbohydrate, protein, and fat-rich food, while micronutrient-rich foods are largely neglected. Against this background, the project aimed to introduce “Healthy Street Food Incentives” (HSFI), a financially self-sustainable strategy aimed at: i) making street food safer through a decentralized, participatory customer-led monitoring, enabling targeted inspections and rewards to safer vendors; and ii) making street food nutritionally more balanced through a Lottery or Scratch & Win that favours vendors and consumers who serve and eat more fruit. The pilot of the plan was to be implemented in Accra (Ghana) and Dar es Salaam (the United Republic of Tanzania); while a region-wide baseline study on the current situation of the street food sector would be carried out in 10 Low-Income-Food-Deprived Countries in Africa ([LIFDCs] Ethiopia, Rwanda, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Madagascar, Mozambique, Kenya, Central African Republic, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo), in order to assess the feasibility of scaling up the plan, and to fine-tune it on the basis of each specific context.

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