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FAO and the Green Climate Fund boost climate action in Small Island Developing States








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    Project
    Building Capacities to Develop Gender-Sensitive Climate Change Adaptation Proposals for Funding Consideration in Caribbean Small Island Developing States - GCP/SLC/019/CAN 2022
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    Owing to their small size, position in tropical cyclone belts and dependence on agriculture and tourism, Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in the Caribbean are particularly vulnerable to climate change and its effects. The agrifood systems of these countries require adaptive measures to support resilience to climate change and sustainability to ensure food and nutrition security and to reduce the impacts of climate change on vulnerable groups, including women and Indigenous Peoples. This project was designed to support efforts to increase adaptive measures in targeted SIDS (Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Suriname) by building national capacities to develop concept notes and full proposals for gender sensitive climate adaptation projects, so that these countries can access climate and environmental financing through the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and the Global Environmental Facility (GEF).
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Gender, agrifood value chains and climate-resilient agriculture in Small Island Developing States
    Evidence from: Barbados and Saint Lucia in the Caribbean, Palau and Samoa in the Pacific, Cabo Verde,the Comoros and Sao Tome and Principe in the Atlantic, Indian Ocean and South China Sea (AIS) region
    2022
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    In the current context of climate change, focusing on gender equality in the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) can drive improvements in resilience, food security and nutrition. This document seeks to enrich the knowledge and evidence base on gender, food systems and resilience in the SIDS of the Caribbean, the Pacific, and the Atlantic, Indian Ocean and South China Sea (AIS) region, providing evidence from Barbados, Cabo Verde, Comoros (the), Palau, Saint Lucia, Samoa and Sao Tome and Principe. It focuses specifically on gender-related roles, gender gaps and traditional knowledge in agriculture and natural resource management to better support women’s participation in value chains and the benefits they receive from value chain development. It calls for radical transformations to build resilient livelihoods, overcome gender inequalities and help rural women and men reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate change and natural disasters. Furthermore, the transformations called for, which focus on gender equity, will increase the resilience of rural livelihoods to unforeseen events, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in view of the critical role women play in ensuring food security and nutrition.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Transforming agriculture in Africa’s Small Island Developing States: Lessons learnt and options for climate-smart agriculture investments in Cabo Verde, Guinea-Bissau and Seychelles 2021
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    There are 52 Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in the world. These boast of rich biodiversity landscapes, including a large variety of endemic species and indigenous knowledge that can make them the repository of our planetary ecosystem (UNEP, 2014). Nevertheless, the SIDS are identified as being one of the negatively impacted areas of climate change in the world, with huge implications for biodiversity loss and survival. There is a general consensus that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from small islands are negligible in comparison to global emissions, but the effects of climate change are devastating as a consequence of the sea level rise associated with global warming (Nurse et al., 2014). Long-term risks projected for small islands include increase in coastal flooding, freshwater stress and risks across marine ecosystems. Other threats to the SIDS include more frequent strong winds and cyclones, sea water intrusion into aquifers, and freshwater scarcity (Kelman and West, 2009). The apparent inability of these countries to adequately and effectively adapt to these impacts is the result of a combination of factors, including their exposure, sensitivity and vulnerability to shocks, and the costly nature of adaptation measures (Robinson, 2019). The report includes an introductory chapter, and climate change and the importance of the AFOLU sectors in the second and third chapters, respectively. The fourth and fifth chapters discuss the challenges in agriculture and the needs and priorities for climate change adaptation and mitigation. The adoption of CSA for integrated climate action as well as barriers to adopting promising CSA technologies/practices are discussed in Chapter 6. Furthermore, the capacity development needs required to address barriers to adoption of CSA opportunities and drive sustainable and tranformational results at scale are discussed. Lastly, the forward-looking chapter discusses knowledge gaps, such as the insufficient capture of the fishery subsector in the country CSA profiles, given its contribution to food security and the countries’ economy, and recommends priority areas to serve as entry points for CSA investments.

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