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Nutrition country profile: Syrian Arab Republic 2005








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    Country nutrition paper Bangladesh
    International Conference on Nutrition 21 years later, 19-21 November 2014 Rome, Italy
    2014
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    Bangladesh has made significant progress tackling undernutrition over the last two decades. Progress has also been made increasing enrolment at primary schools, lowering the infant mortality rate and maternal mortality ratio, improving immunization coverage and reducing the incidence of communicable diseases. Despite these significant achievements, levels of stunting and underweight are still high than the WHO/CDC threshold level for emergency and is considered a severe public health problem. Al though the prevalence of underweight has also been on a steady downward trend since 1990 and Bangladesh has the momentum to achieve the fifth World Health Assembly global target of a 40% reduction in child stunting by 2025. In Bangladesh, malnutrition is caused by a combination of factors including faulty food consumption, food utilization owing to poor sanitation, illness and inadequate health care. Although, Bangladesh attained notable progress in universal coverage of water supply.
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    Nutrition country profile: Republic of the Gambia 2010 2010
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    The Republic of The Gambia, situated on the western coast of Africa, forms a narrow enclave in the Republic of Senegal except for a short seaboard on the Atlantic coastline. The population, very young, is now predominantly urban. Nevertheless agriculture remains a key sector of The Gambia’s economy and is the source of livelihood for more than three-quarters of the population. Economic performance has improved, but as yet, this has not translated into reduced poverty, which remains widespread an d severe, with about 60% of the population below the poverty line. Although a slight improvement has been observed since 2000, infant and under-five mortality rates remain high. A high maternal mortality ratio is also observed. Access to health facilities is relatively good, but poor quality of services reduces the effectiveness of the health system. Nevertheless, immunization coverage among children is expanding.
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    FAO - Nutrition country profiles: Namibia 2001 2001
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    The Gross National Product (GNP) in Namibia accounted for 2,210 US$ in 1997, well above average GNP in Sub-Saharan-Africa (480) and Lower-middle income countries (1,710). However, Namibia’s income distribution is one of the most unequal in the world. In 1996 AIDS overtook tuberculosis as the main killer disease. There were 1,539 registered deaths from AIDS in 1998, compared with 847 from TB and 723 from malaria, which is endemic in the north. The epidemic has dramatically reduced averaged life e xpectancy from 57 years in 1990 to 50 in 1998 and is expected to decrease to 46.5 in 2000.The Infant Mortality Rate was 63 per 1000 life births in 1995. In 1995-98, 85% of one year old infants were immunised for TB, 74% for DPT, 74% for Polio and 63% for measles. The maternal mortality rate reached 230 per 100,000 life births. Data collected in 1991 revealed that only 43% of the rural population could access safe water supply while less than 20% had toilets.

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