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Biodiversity and carbon sequestration assessments for wetland management framework in the wetlands in Bangladesh for climate mitigation and adaptation

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Volume yield, tree species diversity and carbon storage of sacred groves in Southwestern Nigeria
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Recently, the role of sacred groves in biodiversity conservation and provision of ecosystem goods and services has been a subjected to scientific investigation. In this study, data were collected from four sacred groves (Osun‐Osogbo, Igbo‐Olodumare, Idanre Hills and Ogun‐Onire) in southwestern, Nigeria to investigate their volume yield, tree species diversity, biomass and carbon storage potentials. Data were collected from 32 sample plots of 20 m x 40 m, established across the four sacred groves. In each plot, all woody plants with dbh ≥10cm were identified and their growth variables (dbh and height) measured. Non‐destructive allometric equation method was adopted for the estimation of volume, biomass and carbon stock production. The number of families and tree species encountered in the groves (understory and overstory layers) ranged from 22 to 32 and 41 to 85, respectively. The four groves had high Shannon‐Wiener diversity index (2.63 ‐ 3.55). They had high volume yield (244.99 m3 ha‐1 to 343.08 m3 ha‐1), biomass production (87.8 t ha‐1 to 231.86 t ha‐1) and carbon stock (43.9 t ha‐1 to 115.9 t ha‐1), with potentials for continuous growth as evidenced by the presence of young trees in the lower canopy. Thus, besides being good biodiversity conservation method, sacred groves act as sink of atmospheric CO2 considering their high biomass and carbon accumulation. The use and protection of sacred groves by indigenous people has enhanced tree species diversity, improved carbon sequestration and production of other forests ecosystem goods and services, thereby mitigating climate change and its effects. Keywords: Biomass, Climate change, Carbon stock, Carbon sequestration, sacred forest and Traditional methods ID: 3605244
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    Assessing tree succession, species diversity and carbon sequestration potentials in off-reserve secondary forests for REDD+ implementation in Ghana
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Ghana is losing its primary forest, mostly forest reserves at an alarming rate. Secondary forests play a vital role in tropical landscapes, but few studies exist to assess their regeneration pathways and carbon sequestration in Ghana. We sought to find out the regeneration potentials, species diversity and carbon stocks accumulation of off-reserve secondary forests in the Moist Semi-deciduous and Dry Semi-deciduous zones. Four age classes were studied; 0-5, 6-10, 11-15 and 15+ years. Four plots with three replications were used for each age class. Nested plots were chosen; 33 m x 33 m for trees (dbh≥ 5 cm) 10 m x 10 m for saplings (≥1m tall and dbh <5cm) and 2 m x 2 m for seedlings. Age had significant differences in tree (dbh≥ 5 cm) density and basal area between the sites but not on sapling and seedling densities. A total of 129 tree species with dbh ≥5cm belonging to 95 genera and 40 families were identified. Mean Shannon-Weiner diversity index of trees (dbh ≥ 5cm) was 3.6±0.2 and 3.3±0.3 for the Moist Semi-deciduous and Dry Semi-deciduous zones respectively. Both age and forest site had significant effect on aboveground carbon accumulation with age of forest having more significance than climatic conditions. Age of a secondary forest has more effect on the species composition than climate. The secondary forest depicts the characteristic of young growth where the tree densities of most trees are confined to dbh= 5- 10cm in both zones and the potential of rapid recovery of species and carbon accumulation represents an important source of timber and carbon sink. The strong presence of regeneration portrays the potential for carbon sequestration under Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) if secondary forests are managed well in Ghana. Collaborative management of secondary forests with farmers and good forest polices can help Ghana achieve benefits such as timber, woodfuel, and carbon to participate in REDD+. Keywords: [Deforestation and forest degradation, REDD+, secondary forest, Climate change, Landscape management]\ ID: 3617260
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    Can carbon be sequestered in Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens Cuvier 1825) habitats in Nepal?
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Forest carbon stock can provide alternative opportunity for the conservation of forests and biodiversity. Previous studies on red panda habitats in Nepal barely provide accurate information of carbon stock from those habitats which is critical for devising long term conservation plan for this species. Thus, the present study aims to document and describe carbon sequestration in red panda habitat to create the first-ever broad- scale scientific basis for the promotion of red panda conservation efforts with a limelight on carbon stock. Extensive field surveys conducted to record red panda presence only data in red panda range rural municipalities of Jajarkot district. A total of 261 red panda presence point were recorded and a quadrate of 10 m*10 m were laid to record the Diameter at Breast height (DBH) and height of trees. The study assessed the above ground and below ground tree biomass carbon stock. The above ground tree biomass was found 1952.49±1279.34 ton/ha whereas below ground tree biomass was 390.49±255.86 ton/ha. Likewise, above ground carbon stock was found 917.67±601.29 ton/ha and below ground was 183.53±120.25 ton/ha. Total carbon stock of the forest was 1101.21±721.55 ton/ha and CO2 equivalent is 4037.75±2645.68 ton/ha. This study gives way to link forest carbon stock and biodiversity conservation. Assessing the relationship between carbon stocks and biodiversity is important in understanding the trade-off between two major benefits of forest ecosystems. The study could be used as a background to suggest alternative strategies to conserve the red panda habitats, taking into account the social and economic concerns and climate change benefits from forests in low-income highland communities. Keywords: Biodiversity conservation, Climate change, Governance, Deforestation and forest degradation. ID: 3623924

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