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Price Volatility in Food and Agricultural Markets: A policy response









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    Sustainable Agricultural Productivity Growth and Bridging the Gap for Small-Family Farms
    Interagency Report to the Mexican G20 Presidency
    2017
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    This report is submitted to the G20 Mexican Presidency by Bioversity, CGIAR Consortium, FAO, IFAD, IFPRI, IICA, OECD, UNCTAD, Coordination team of UN High Level Task Force on the Food Security Crisis, WFP, World Bank and WTO. It responds to Mexico's request for information and advice on practical actions that could be undertaken to sustainably improve agricultural productivity growth, in particular on small family farms. The approach taken reflects the view of the collaborating international org anisations that a successful strategy for sustainable agricultural productivity growth requires significant improvements in the investment climate in many countries, in agricultural innovation systems and farming practices, in the management of natural resources, and in specific policies and efforts to close the productivity gap of small family farms. This report first examines current trends in productivity and its main drivers ― innovation, investment and policy.
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    International grain reserves and other instruments to address volatility in grain markets
    Working paper presented at the World Grain Forum 2009 St. Petersburg/Russian Federation, 6-7 June 2009
    2013
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    The dramatic rise in global food prices in 2007/08 was widely viewed as a threat to global food and nutrition security that endangered millions of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable. It has also brought political instability to some countries and the prospect of unrest to many more. The rapid increase in world food prices was caused by a combination of cumulative effects of long-term trends, more recent supply and demand dynamics, and (governmental) responses that have exacerbated price volatility. This crisis has exposed existing and potential weaknesses and vulnerabilities of households, governments, and the international system to food and nutrition insecurity. The international community has responded with a range of initiatives and established instruments to assist the neediest nations. Major stakeholders worldwide continue to discuss potential instruments to address the recent food crisis and to prevent or reduce the impact of future crises. Besides a gricultural productivity improvement and national food self-sufficiency targets, physical grain stocks (“humanitarian food reserves”) have resurfaced in these discussions. And more recently, the idea of “a ‘virtual’ internationally coordinated reserve system for humanitarian purposes”—first mentioned in the G8 Leaders’ Statement on Global Food Security at the Hokkaido Toyako Summit on July 8, 2008—was added to the debate. In conjunction with the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum, the Russian Federation will host, on June 6 and 7, 2009, the World Grain Forum 2009. During the Forum, which intends to shape a common vision of issues facing global food (grain) security and to inform future G8/G20 meetings, high-level discussions are expected to cover—inter alia—global grain production and marketing, food aid programs, new challenges of world trade in grain, and mechanisms for the stabilization of grain markets including an international grain reserve.In vie w of the controversies surrounding the topic of grain stocks and other instruments to reduce price volatility in (food) commodity markets, and at the request of the Organizing Committee of the World Grain Forum 2009, The World Bank (WB), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) (the three sponsoring organizations) have commissioned the present working paper on international grain reserves and oth er instruments to address volatility in grain markets. The purpose of this paper is to inform international debates on the occasion of the World Grain Forum 2009 on issues and options related to price volatility in (food) commodity markets with special reference to international grain reserves.
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    Sustainable alternative fodder production to support vulnerable herders in the West Bank. Increasing profitability of livestock production to strengthen resilience to drought and market volatility within protracted crises
    Resilience good practice
    2015
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    Enduring the protracted crisis context of the West Bank and Gaza Strip as well as recurrent drought and overgrazing, herders face decreasing access to grazing land, thus increasing their dependency on imported fodder and making them more vulnerable to fodder price volatility. In an innovative effort to help mitigate the adverse impacts this situation has on the livelihoods of Palestinian herders, FAO promotes the use of hydroponic technology by vulnerable herders and their cooperatives, providin g them with a low-cost, high quality, sustainable source of fodder available year-round. This approach increases the profitability of livestock production and helps herders stay in business.

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