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Using traditional governance systems to manage competition over natural resources








FAO and IUCN SSC HWCCSG. 2023. Using traditional governance systems to manage competition over natural resources. Rome



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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Elephant − Loxodonta africana
    Human-wildlife conflict
    2023
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    This factsheet on human-wildlife conflict focuses on elephants (Loxodonta africana) and was produced by the Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme. The SWM Programme aims to reconcile the challenges of wildlife conservation with food security and rural socio-economic development. To meet this objective, an innovative behaviour change approach is being developed to address human-wildlife conflict (HWC) and create a more balanced coexistence between people and wild animals. The SWM Programme is being funded by the European Union with co-funding from the French Facility for Global Environment (FFEM) and the French Development Agency (AFD). The initiative is coordinated by a dynamic consortium of four partners, namely the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Center for International Forestry Research and World Agroforestry (CIFOR-ICRAF), the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).
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    Building institutional and local community capacity to manage human-wildlife conflict 2023
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    This case study comes from Mozambique, where human-wildlife conflict was not a new issue in 2010. Incidents had been increasing, particularly those involving crocodiles Crocodylus niloticus, and also elephants Loxodonta africana and lions Panthera leo. These incidents impacted food security, local community incomes, well-being and safety, and were exacerbated by poverty levels. Human-wildlife conflict had become a major concern for the Government of Mozambique and led them to formulate a National Strategy for Human-Wildlife Conflict Management (2009-2014). The government approved the Strategy in 2009, and from 2010 its implementation was supported by FAO, through a Technical Cooperation Programme Project The FAO project's objective was to design an implementation plan for the Strategy with the expressed goal of mitigating human-wildlife conflicts and build the needed capacity in the country to be able to do so. This case study focuses on how capacity was built in Mozambique to implement the Strategy. By building capacity in the national government agencies, the FAO project empowered the government agencies to guide and implement the country's national strategy on human-wildlife conflict. The overhauled database, covering five years (2006-2010), was presented at the Council of Ministers, in order to underscore the importance of the situation in Mozambique, inform the Ministers of the problem, and highlight some of the tools available to reduce the impacts of human-wildlife conflict, particularly the crocodile cages that had been used and improved.
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    Human-Wildlife Conflict Worldwide: Collection of Case studies, Analysis of Management Strategies and Good Practices 2005
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    Human-Wildlife Conflict (HWC) is fast becoming a serious threat to the survival of many endangered species in the world. The case studies from countries all over the world demonstrate the severity of the conflict and suggest that greater in depth analysis of the conflict is needed in order to avoid overlooking the problem and undermining the conservation of threatened and potentially endangered species. This report provides an insight into the HWC issue, based on a selection of relevant case stu dies and gathers together the key lessons learned. This is a comprehensive review covering a wide array of the available literature on wild mammal-human conflict, with the exception of human-elephant, written over the last ten years. It highlights common problems and solutions across bio-geographical regions in order to provide a better understanding of the HWC issue worldwide. It also shows that these conflicts have similar causes and impacts, and that accurate and detailed information, scienti fic research and stakeholder commitment are key to the development of appropriate and sustainable strategies for both resolving the problem and conserving different ecosystems and their wildlife inhabitants.

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