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Strengthening Inclusive Sustainable Economic Growth in the Agriculture Sector to Promote Food and Nutrition Security, Income Generation and Alleviation of Poverty - TCP/PNG/3704







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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    The contribution of public investment in the agricultural sector to economic growth and rural poverty reduction
    A high-level dialogue in Nicaragua based on a prospective analysis
    2020
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    In 2018, the government of Nicaragua requested technical assistance from FAO to carry out a prospective analysis of the Nicaraguan economy and the evolution of rural poverty, in the context of the restrictive economic conditions experienced in the country that year. Thus, the FAO Agricultural Development Economics Division (ESA) in Rome, together with the FAO Country Office in Nicaragua (FAONI) and in close coordination and support with the country’s Ministry of Finance and Public Credit (MHCP), the Central Bank of Nicaragua (BCN) and the Ministry of Agriculture (MAG), developed the study “Analysis of alternative ways of public investment and its impact on economic growth, agriculture and poverty reduction in Nicaragua.” This analysis generated quantitative evidence on the impact of agriculture on economic growth and poverty reduction. The results are clear: in all simulated scenarios, it was verified that an increase – by a value of 0.5 or 1 percent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) – of public investment in the agricultural sector generates economic growth, which is reflected, among other things, in GDP growth that varies between 0.8 and 3.5 percent annually through 2030 depending on the scenario. Moreover, it is observed that the difference in the total poverty rate in rural areas with respect to the base scenario would range between 0.5 and 2.25 percentage points in the same period, depending on the agricultural investment scenario. With regard to extreme poverty, the difference is projected to be between 0.16 and 0.31 points. The ongoing high-level dialogue and collaboration between FAO and Nicaragua’s economic and fiscal policy-making authorities is an excellent example, which should be replicated elsewhere, of how FAO can influence a country’s public policies.
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    FAO COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme - Economic inclusion and social protection to reduce poverty
    Pro-poor COVID-19 responses for an inclusive post-pandemic economic recovery
    2020
    The COVID-19 pandemic is, directly and indirectly, impacting health and well-being around the globe. Illness and containment measures are compounding the social and economic disadvantages of the most vulnerable in society. These social and economic impacts stand to cause devastating setbacks to efforts to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Pervasive inequalities between rural and urban inhabitants, rich and poor, women and men will exacerbate these effects. People in areas impacted by severe climate change, conflict, forced displacement, and migration will be even more vulnerable. Vulnerable groups include rural women, youth and children, indigenous people, the elderly, and people with disabilities. The COVID-19 pandemic has also significantly affected migrants, including refugees and internally displaced people, casual labourers and seasonal migrants, all of whom are exposed to high risk of infection. Economic recovery programmes that do not address these inequalities and place emphasis on pro-poor recovery plans run the risk of reinforcing inequalities in the future. Social protection will be expanded to better reach women, children, informal workers, migrants, and other underserved groups. Integrate rural areas into risk-informed and shock-responsive social-protection components, linked with early warning, conflict-sensitive programming, and climate adaptation.
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    Poverty alleviation and food security in Asia: lessons and challenges 1999
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