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The impact of the Chilean law on food labelling on the food production sector










Corvalán, C., Correa, T., Reyes, M. and Paraje, G. 2021 The impact of the Chilean law on food labelling on the food production sector. Santiago, FAO and INTA.





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    Book (series)
    La ley chilena de etiquetado de alimentos/The Chilean food labelling law
    Conferencia celebrada en la Sede de la FAO sobre el papel de los frentes parlamentarios en la mejora de la nutrición en el mundo
    2018
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    An adequate nutrition provides us with the necessary energy for the appropriate functioning and care of our body, and is the first defence against diseases. However, many people today still do not have access to food, do not eat enough or do not eat poorly. Nutrition problems (malnutrition, obesity, etc.) encompass inappropriate choices and practices that can be addressed through effective public policies. In this context, parliamentary alliances such as the Parliamentary Front against Hunger in Latin America and the Caribbean, and specialized agencies such as FAO, play a key role in educating consumers and preventing diseases. During an event on the role of parliamentarians in improving global nutrition, on 14 June 2018 at FAO headquarters, Senator Guido Girardi Lavin presented the Chilean initiative aimed at fighting against unhealthy foods. Also participating at the event were Jesús Manuel Gracia Aldaz, former Ambassador of Spain to the Italian State, and Anna Lartey, Director of FAO’s Nutrition and Food Systems Division. This publication is a collection of the speeches that took place on this occasion.
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    Chile's food law and the prevention of obesity 2017
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    This document was formulated by the Pan American Health Organization/ World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). It was designed to share the Chilean experience while Law Nº 20,606 regarding the Nutritional Composition of Food and Food Advertising (hereinafter the Food Act) was being passed(1) with members of parliament and other decision makers from different countries throughout the Americas. This process encompasses formulation of the Act, its entry into force and monitoring of the Act, which may also apply to other public policies of this type, which is to say, that favor the general population’s health. Chile is one of the countries in the Region with the highest overweight and obesity rates for children and adults(2). In 2009-2010, over 60% of the population between the ages of 15 and 64 was overweight or obese(3). The problem is even more serious for the population with fewer years of education(4) and which belongs to the low- and mediu m-income quintiles(5). The proportion of overweight and obese persons has increased very quickly, since 7% of first-grade elementary (primary school) students were considered obese in 1987 and this figure came to 24.6% in 2016(6, 7). Supply, demand and consumption of processed and ultraprocessed food and beverages with industrial formulations consisting of substances derived from food or synthesized from other organic sources increased between 1987 and 2016. Some of these products are sold for i mmediate consumption, since these are ready to eat after heating(8). Most products sold in supermarkets fall into this category, despite the fact that there is evidence that these foods lead to weight gain and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease(8). Chilean people have the highest per capita soft drink consumption rate in the world and has the second- highest per capita ultraprocessed food sales in the Region(8). In addition, only 14% of the Chilean population follow three or more dietar y guidelines recommendations and only 5% have a healthy diet(4). If no changes are made, healthcare expenses stemming from obesity in Chile are estimated to increase from 0.5% of the country’s GDP in 2016 to 1.6% in 2030(9) or amount to approximately US$ 750 million per year for the next 20 years. These reasons motivated the public sector to consider and implement a series of policies, plans and programs to reduce overweight and obesity rates, which led to formulation of the Food Act.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Labelling and certification schemes for Indigenous Peoples' foods
    Generating income while protecting and promoting Indigenous Peoples’ values
    2022
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    This review, for the first time to date, analyses the potential of labelling and certification schemes for Indigenous Peoples to market their food products. Specifically, it looks at those schemes that are designed by, with and for Indigenous Peoples, and that can provide economic, social and environmental benefits while protecting and promoting their unique values centered around the respect of life and Mother Earth. Eleven examples in this review cover innovative schemes implemented by Indigenous Peoples and practitioners in Africa, Asia, Central and South America and Oceania. They include territorial labels, geographical indications (GI), and participatory guarantee schemes (PGS), among others. In addition, the publication features one case study of a community-supported agriculture (CSA), as alternative example to engage with Indigenous Peoples and reaching out the market. Important factors that lead to the success of different schemes include (1) the leadership and ownership of Indigenous Peoples in the initiative (2) adequate support by external stakeholders including public and private sector, and universities (3) raising consumer awareness and education on Indigenous food products via fairs, festivals and other platforms, and (4) designing value chains and policies in a way that harmonize local, domestic and international trade. The review includes recommendations for various actors to support Indigenous Peoples in their self-determined economic development and towards the sustainable marketization of their products. The review also provides guidelines for Indigenous Peoples willing to engage in such initiatve. Those are applicable to different contexts on the ground, and include good practices, and measures to mitigate risks.

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