Thumbnail Image

World markets and industry of selected commercially-exploited aquatic species with an international conservation profile










Catarci, C. World markets and industry of selected commercially-exploited aquatic species with an international conservation profile. FAO Fisheries Circular. No. 990. Rome, FAO. 2004. 186p.


Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Manual for the monitoring and management of queen conch 2005
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Caribbean queen conch Strombus gigas is listed on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). A listing on Appendix II requires that any specimen of the species included in Appendix II can only be exported if a permit has been issued to allow the export. Further, CITES states that export permits should only be issued when the responsible authority has deemed that the export will not be detrimental to the survival of that species . This manual presents guidelines on the requirements for responsible management of the fisheries exploiting queen conch, with particular emphasis on the requirements to comply with the relevant CITES regulations. The manual describes the basic fisheries management cycle which includes: development and interpretation of policy; the need for management controls to regulate fishing activities; data collection and analysis; decision-making; enforcement of and compliance with the management controls ; and regular feedback and review of the management system. It provides general guidance on each of those steps for the queen conch fisheries of the Caribbean. It also provides two case studies of management systems currently being applied: the Turks and Caicos Islands and Jamaica.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the Expert Consultation on Implementation Issues Associated with Listing Commercially-Exploited Aquatic Species on CITES Appendices. Rome, Italy, 25-28 May 2004 2004
    Also available in:

    The Expert Consultation on Implementation Issues Associated with Listing Commercially-exploited Aquatic Species on CITES Appendices was held at FAO Headquarters from 25 to 28 May 2004. It was held in response to the agreement by the Twenty-fifth Session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) that an Expert Consultation should be convened to address the following issues, related to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES): „X CITES Article II Fundamental Principles, Paragraph 2(b), the 'look-alike' clause; „X Annex 3 of CITES Resolution Conf. 9.24 Criteria for Amendment of Appendices I and II, which deals with split-listing; and aquaculture issues as a group, noting the inter-relationships in these topics. „X Administrative and monitoring implications of listing and down-listing, including the implications of Annex 4 of Res. Conf. 9.24 for this. It was agreed that this should also include an analysis of the socio-economic im pact of listing on sturgeon, queen conch and a number of hypothetical listing proposals. The meeting was attended by 11 experts from 10 countries, with expertise covering the terms of reference for the Consultation, and by a member of the CITES Secretariat. After extensive discussions, the Consultation agreed on a number of key recommendations. Amongst these were that States needed to improve communication and co-ordination between their national governmental agencies responsible for CITES implementation and those responsible for natural resource management, including fisheries. Attention was drawn to the concern of many FAO members that a sufficiently responsive and flexible mechanism for listing and de-listing is required in CITES. It was suggested that FAO could raise this concern with CITES, taking into consideration the nature of safeguard mechanisms for down-listing commercially-exploited aquatic species and the manner in which they might be applied. The Consultation discussed the approaches used within CITES to assist Customs and others in identifying specimens and species. It raised the need to examine alternative approaches that would effectively address enforcement and identification issues in a manner that would avoid unnecessary listing of look-alike species. Similarly there was examination of the potential problems for fisheries if there was inflexible adherence by CITES Parties to the guidance on split-listing. The nature and implications of CITES pe rmitting procedures for aquaculture systems were examined. The Consultation examined some case studies of commercially-exploited aquatic species that were on a CITES Appendix but these did not provide sufficient information on the costs and benefits of a CITES listing. It was recommended that further work on this was required. The Consultation raised the need for capacity-building to assist States to meet their obligations under CITES. Attention was drawn to the fact that implementation o f the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and the associated international plans of action should help to reduce the incidence of listing proposals for commercially-exploited aquatic species.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the Regional Workshop on the Monitoring and Management of Queen Conch, Strombus gigas. Kingston, Jamaica, 1–5 May 2006. 2007
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This document contains the report of the Regional Workshop on the Monitoring and Management of Queen Conch, Strombus gigas, held in Kingston, Jamaica, from 1 to 5 May 2006. The purpose of the workshop was to assist Caribbean countries in the development of effective management plans for queen conch fisheries and, consequently, to improve their capacity to implement regulations and obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CIT ES) and the Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) of the regional Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region (Cartagena Convention). The workshop addressed issues related to: policies and legislation; management objectives, indicators and reference points; management controls; and enforcement and compliance. These issues were addressed at the national level, through the preparation of Draft Fisheri es Management Plans by the participating countries, and at regional level through working groups formed during the workshop. Results from the workshop led to recommendations aimed at improving queen conch fisheries management at national and regional level.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.