Thumbnail Image

Socio-economic Survey EADD-MICCA Pilot Project in Kenya. Final report

Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Programme Background Report 4









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Socio-economic Survey CARE-MICCA Pilot Project in the United Republic of Tanzania. Final report
    Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Programme Background Report 3
    2012
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The main goal of FAO’s Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Programme is to facilitate the contribution of developing countries to the mitigation of climate change in agriculture and supporting them towards adopting low‐carbon emission agriculture. The Programme also supports FAO’s primary objective of improving food security, nutrition and agricultural productivity. In the United Republic of Tanzania, the MICCA Programme is cooperating with CARE International and the World Agrofo restry Centre (ICRAF) within the framework of CARE’s Hillside Conservation Agriculture Project (HICAP). The objective of the cooperation is to broaden the perspective of the project, which currently focuses on conservation agriculture (CA), to include climate change mitigation. The objective of the socio‐economic survey is to collect data on livelihoods, agricultural practices and climate change awareness among small‐holder farmers in the project areas. The survey design can be utilized later or adjusted so that it can serve as a tool to evaluate the outcomes and impacts on the socio‐economic situation of activities from other MICCA Programme activities in such areas as capacity development and greenhouse gas assessment. The survey was carried out in the Uluguru Hills. Data was collected in five villages that are representative of the terrain and population, with a total of 333 farmers interviewed. At least two focus group discussions were conducted in each village. The team is aware o f possible interviewer effects and other factors that may affect the validity and reliability of data. At several points, it is emphasized that the findings should be treated carefully and considered as estimates rather than hard data. The percentage of HICAP participants in the sample is quite low (17.4 percent). Farmers are involved in several activities simultaneously and most participate in groups, such as Farmer Field Schools (FFS) or VSL (Village Saving and Loans). Through these groups, fa rmers have access to specific services and training opportunities provided by HICAP.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Payment for forest ecosystem services through willingness to pay in Oba Hill Forest Reserve, Osun State, Nigeria
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Forest supplies several products and services and these services includes timber and non-timber products, as well as a number of intangible or non- market services. Forest ecosystem services are complicated because many of these services are difficult to evaluate in monetary terms. This study assessed the socio-economic characteristics of the respondents, willingness to pay (WTP) and factors that influenced the WTP for ecosystem services in Oba Hill forest reserve, Osun State. A pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire and interview guide was used to collect information from the respondents. A total number of 100 respondents were selected randomly in the adjoining forest communities. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the socio-economic characteristics of the respondents and choice experiment was used to assess Willingness-to-Pay (WTP) and factors that influenced them D-Optimal design with a D-efficiency of 99.9% was developed for the choice experiment. A practical set of 9 choice sets with two product profiles and a status quo alternative were obtained. Random Parameters Mixed Multinomial Logit (MIXL) and Generalized Multinomial Logit (G-MNL) models were used to estimate the willingness to pay (WTP) and the factors that influenced the WTP of an individual for the attributes of forest ecosystem services. Wildlife loss, soil fertility and cost attributes were significant at 0.1% significance level (p≤0.001). Mean WTP estimate of a household for increase in soil fertility, reduction of wildlife loss, multiples of important tree species were 8.60, 7.61 and 39.95 (Naira) per month respectively. Respondents were not willing to pay for the mitigation of weather fluctuation. Also, WTP of the respondents was mainly influenced by farming households. Therefore, this study concludes that the WTP for the ecosystem services in the study area was partly influenced by the socio-economic characteristics of the respondents. Keywords: Ecosystem services; forest reserves; generalized multinomial logit; mixed multinomial logit and willingness to pay ID: 3484151
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Building resilience to climate change-related and other disasters in Ethiopia
    Challenges, lessons and the way forward
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Ethiopia is exposed to a wide range of disasters associated with the country’s extensive dependence on rainfed subsistence agriculture, climate change, resource degradation, diverse geoclimatic and socio-economic conditions and conflicts. Drought and floods are the major challenges, but a number of other threats affect communities and livelihoods. These include conflict, desert locust, fall armyworm, frost and hail, crop pests and diseases, livestock diseases, human diseases, landslides, earthquakes, and urban and forest fires. Every source of evidence suggests that Ethiopia would feel the human and economic impacts of climate change intensely, and the impacts will only continue to grow if the country continues a business-as-usual approach to crisis response, and will not be able to manage the increasing scale of the challenges. Thus, there is call by all stakeholders for a paradigm shift in the way the country deals with communities at risk, in order to take preventive actions to reduce exposure, vulnerability and impact at local level. This requires moving away from a reactive system that solely focuses on drought and supply of life-saving humanitarian relief and emergency responses during disasters to a comprehensive proactive disaster and climate risk management approach, including climate change adaptation, among which are interventions to enhance livelihood diversification, social protection programmes and risk transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, resilient agrifood systems support should include a range of proven interventions that are context-relevant and cover the whole agrifood system, such as increase in fertilizer use where appropriate and high-yielding and drought-tolerant seeds, strengthened extension and advisory systems at the kebele (local) level through the use of farmer field schools and pastoral field schools, expansion of access to credit, livelihood diversification, risk transfer mechanism and institutional development that link short-term emergency relief to long-term development pathways. This approach is essential for building resilience to natural hazard and human-induced disasters resulting in food insecurity challenges. Much progress has been made in the last 50 years in the way of managing mainly drought disaster risks. Large-scale prevention and mitigation programmes have been designed, incorporating a focus on vulnerabilities, household asset-building, and public works for environmental rehabilitation and generation of livelihoods. Preparedness has been enhanced by the development of various policies and strategic documents for assessment and intervention, early warning and response systems, and economic, social and physical infrastructure to strengthen the local economy and household livelihoods. An attempt has also been made for humanitarian response to count on an established risk-financing.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.