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The state of food and agriculture, 2001 (vietnamese version)








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  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    The state of food and agriculture, 2001
    Economic impacts of transboundary plant pests and animal diseases
    2001
    Five years after the World Food Summit, and at the beginning of the twenty-first century, The State of Food and Agriculture reflects on some of the main challenges faced in eliminating world hunger and poverty. The task may be daunting, but so are the numbers of hungry and undernourished people whose fate is dependent on decisive and accelerated action. I am convinced that, with a renewed commitment and determined, concerted effort, the goal of the World Food Summit can be met.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    The State of Food and Agriculture, 2002 2002
    The centrality of food, agriculture and rural development to poverty alleviation and the eradication of hunger underlies most of The State of Food and Agriculture 2002. It attempts both to provide an overview of the current situation and to reflect on some of the major challenges faced in eliminating world hunger and poverty and ensuring the sustainable use of our natural resources.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    The State of Food and Agriculture, 2005
    Agricultural trade and poverty can trade work for the poor?
    2005
    Can trade work for the poor? The State of Food and Agriculture 2005 examines the many ways trade and trade liberalization affect the poor and food-insecure. It is found that trade can be a catalyst for change, promoting conditions that enable the poor to raise their incomes and live longer, healthier and more productive lives. But because the poor often survive on a narrow margin, they are particularly vulnerable in any reform process, especially in the short run as productive sectors and labour markets adjust. Opening national agricultural markets to international competition especially from subsidized competitors before basic market institutions and infrastructure are in place can undermine the agriculture sector with long-term negative consequences for poverty and food security. Among the many important lessons from this analysis is the need for policy-makers to consider carefully how trade and complementary policies can be used to promote pro-poor growth. The report recommends a twin-track approach: investing in human capital, institutions and infrastructure to enable the poor to take advantage of trade-related opportunities, while establishing safety nets to protect vulnerable members of society.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    The state of food and agriculture, 2001
    Economic impacts of transboundary plant pests and animal diseases
    2001
    Five years after the World Food Summit, and at the beginning of the twenty-first century, The State of Food and Agriculture reflects on some of the main challenges faced in eliminating world hunger and poverty. The task may be daunting, but so are the numbers of hungry and undernourished people whose fate is dependent on decisive and accelerated action. I am convinced that, with a renewed commitment and determined, concerted effort, the goal of the World Food Summit can be met.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    The State of Food and Agriculture, 2002 2002
    The centrality of food, agriculture and rural development to poverty alleviation and the eradication of hunger underlies most of The State of Food and Agriculture 2002. It attempts both to provide an overview of the current situation and to reflect on some of the major challenges faced in eliminating world hunger and poverty and ensuring the sustainable use of our natural resources.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    The State of Food and Agriculture, 2005
    Agricultural trade and poverty can trade work for the poor?
    2005
    Can trade work for the poor? The State of Food and Agriculture 2005 examines the many ways trade and trade liberalization affect the poor and food-insecure. It is found that trade can be a catalyst for change, promoting conditions that enable the poor to raise their incomes and live longer, healthier and more productive lives. But because the poor often survive on a narrow margin, they are particularly vulnerable in any reform process, especially in the short run as productive sectors and labour markets adjust. Opening national agricultural markets to international competition especially from subsidized competitors before basic market institutions and infrastructure are in place can undermine the agriculture sector with long-term negative consequences for poverty and food security. Among the many important lessons from this analysis is the need for policy-makers to consider carefully how trade and complementary policies can be used to promote pro-poor growth. The report recommends a twin-track approach: investing in human capital, institutions and infrastructure to enable the poor to take advantage of trade-related opportunities, while establishing safety nets to protect vulnerable members of society.

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