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Executive Summary - The charcoal transition










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    Book (stand-alone)
    The charcoal transition 2017
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    Charcoal is widely used for cooking and heating in developing countries. The consumption of charcoal has been at high level and the demand may keep growing over the next decades, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Some preliminary studies indicate that among commonly used cooking fuels, unsustainably produced charcoal can be the most greenhouse gas intensive fuels and simple measures could deliver high GHG mitigation benefits. Through the Paris Agreement on climate change adopted in 2015, count ries set themselves ambitious targets to curb climate change, and forest-related measures have an important role to play in climate change mitigation and adaptation. Over 70% of the countries who have submitted their (intended) nationally determined contributions (NDCs) mention forestry and land use mitigation measures. Despite the importance of woodfuel in many countries, few have explicitly included measures to reduce emissions from woodfuel production and consumption. Many of the NDCs that in clude forestry do not yet provide detailed information on how mitigation is to be achieved. The overall objective of the publication is to provide data and information to allow for informed decision-making on the contribution sustainable charcoal production and consumption can make to climate change mitigation. More specifically, the publication aims to answer the following questions: - What are the climate change impacts of the current practices on charcoal production and consumption worldwide and across regions? - What is the potential of sustainable charcoal production in GHG emission reductions and how such potential can be achieved? - What are the key barriers to sustainable charcoal production and what actions are required to develop a climate-smart charcoal sector?
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    Bioenergy and food security (BEFS) assessment – Seychelles 2022
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    A sustainable and stable energy supply is essential for a country’s stability and wellbeing. Seychelles, like many small island developing states (SIDS), currently depends on imported energy, in the form of fossil fuels. The high dependence on fossil fuel imports means Seychelles is highly vulnerable to disruptions in global markets. The situation is exacerbated by a reliance on imported food, which accounts for about 70 percent of food consumption. To limit this dependence, it is aiming to increase its reliance on renewable energy to 15 percent by 2030, with a long-term ambition of using 100 percent renewable sources for electricity production. Sustainable bioenergy is one form of renewable energy that can be used to green a country’s energy mix. This Sustainable Bioenergy Assessment report for Seychelles looks at the potential for sustainable bioenergy within the country, considering the country context, conditions and delicate habitat. The report considers sustainable biomass sources from the agriculture, forestry and waste sectors. The assessment was conducted following the bioenergy and food security (BEFS) approach of FAO, and identifies a number of bioenergy pathways relevant for the country. Within the report, the different forms of biomass, their availability and viability are assessed. Livestock, crop and forestry residues, and the biodegradable portion of waste, otherwise destined for landfill, are among the sources of biomass considered. The use of these biomass types and amounts are then assessed from a technical and economic point of view, under different price scenarios, for the production of energy.
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