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Social protection as a pathway to sustaining peace









FAO. 2024. Social protection as a pathway to sustaining peace. Rome. 



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    Book (stand-alone)
    Operationalizing pathways to sustaining peace in the context of Agenda 2030
    A how-to guide
    2022
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    Violent conflict has increased in recent decades. The number of people worldwide who live in settings where conflict and violence are a daily occurrence is increasing. By 2030, it is estimated that more than half of all people living in poverty will be found in countries affected by high levels of violence. These conflict dynamics have a negative impact on households’ food security. Agriculture, natural resources, food security and nutrition can be sources of peace or conflict, crisis or recovery, tragedy or healing. Underpinning this is ensuring that the Organization’s projects and interventions are conflict-sensitive so that all stakeholders understand the dynamics of the diverse contexts in which FAO works. Especially in fragile and conflict-affected contexts, we need to make sure that our work avoids contributing to divisions, disputes and violent conflict, and does no harm. All that we do – both by ourselves and through partnerships – should follow this approach. We can also identify where FAO can positively contribute to social cohesion and peace – and these efforts must be rooted in robust theories of change. FAO is placing increasing emphasis on ensuring that our interventions make a positive contribution to peace – an objective shared across the United Nations system, and increasingly a requirement of our partners and donors. The focus of this how-to guide is to elaborate the pathways through which the Organization can optimize deliberate contributions to peace, and inform the design, adaptation and impact measurement of its interventions. In recent years, FAO has developed corporate tools, guidance and training on conflict sensitivity and context analysis. Operationalizing pathways to sustaining peace in the context of Agenda 2030 – A how-to guide is another crucial document in that series, developed through collaboration between the FAO Conflict and Peace Unit and Interpeace in the context of a wider partnership between the two Organizations. Following broad consultation across the Organization, this document provides operational guidance and inspiration to FAO project and technical staff on how our work can enhance FAO’s contributions to peace – and how to measure those contributions. It is part of an ongoing process, which complements FAO’s efforts through its Strategic Framework to support the transformation to more efficient, inclusive, resilient and sustainable agrifood systems, for better production, better nutrition, better environment and better life, leaving no one behind.
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    Document
    Sustaining Peace Webinar I: The role of conflict-sensitive natural resource management approaches
    Webinar report - 23 January 2018
    2018
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    Interventions supporting food security and nutrition play a critical role in protecting and saving lives and livelihoods and in strengthening resilience in conflict-affected situations. However, interventions supporting livelihoods, particularly those focused on natural resource management, can also play an important role in sustaining peace and in directly preventing conflict, through a number of different pathways. Some of these pathways are explored in the 2017 State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report on ‘Building Resilience for Peace and Food Security’, and are referenced in the 2015 CFS Framework For Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crises (CFS-FFA). This webinar examined the linkages between natural resource management (NRM), investment in resilient agricultural livelihoods and contributions to peacebuilding and sustaining peace. It explored how conflict-sensitive approaches to natural resource access and use can make contribution to sustaining peace, and how investments in building resilience can help reduce specific conflict drivers. The event drew on and be illustrated by examples from: 1. SIPRI’s perspectives on climate security and management of natural resource conflicts, focusing on laying the foundations for socially, economically and politically resilient peace; 2. Mercy Corps/pact’s experience on natural resource sharing agreements between the Dodoth and Turkana in Uganda to strengthen communities’ capacities to manage interethnic conflicts; and 3. FAO’s work on natural resource access and use between Misseriya and Dinka Ngok communities through a multi-sector livelihood project in the contested Abyei Administrative Area (AAA).
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    Booklet
    Deploying a humanitarian-development-peace nexus approach: Exploring, strengthening and reviving dryland ecosystems 2021
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    The FAO-CARE- CGIAR joint technical working paper will contribute to developing an FAO position and improved understanding of the links between, and risks of, climate change and various kinds of conflict as related to FAO’s mandate, with particular attention to crisis contexts in dryland forests and agrosilvopastoral areas. More broadly, this will feed into UN system-level discussion and processes related to the multidimensional nature of Climate Security. The working paper will unpack how combined climate shocks, environmental degradation, and conflict exacerbate people’s vulnerability and reflect how responses should adapt to tackle these compounding challenges and bolster resilience. The joint study will gather and analyse examples of strategies and interventions that help communities identify and mitigate combined climate, environmental and conflict risks. The paper will then draw lessons learned and recommendations for design and implement projects that support people in achieving long term food security or in building up their ability to cope with multiple shocks, including those of climate change and conflict. The joint study will be based on the premise that humanitarian, development and peace efforts are complementary and mutually-reinforcing and provide evidence that integrated responses offer the most effective way to tackle the root causes of people's vulnerability in crises contexts. It will target donors, policy-makers and practitioners from different disciplines.

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