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Working towards ZERO rabies in Viet Nam










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Working towards ZERO rabies in Viet Nam 2016
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    Rabies became a pressing problem in the Northern mountainous provinces of Viet Nam and gradually spreading to other provinces which has no or few cases for many years. Between 2007-2015, approximately 90 people died from rabies annually in 30 provinces (out of 63 nationwide). The provinces with the highest number of deaths were Phu Tho, Yen Bai, Hanoi, Tuyen Quang, and Gia Lai. Dogs are responsible for transmitting the virus to more than 95% of rabies cases in humans in Viet Nam. During the past five year, approximate of 400,000 people received Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) including bite wound treatment and vaccination preventing further human deaths (NIHE report 2015). Key factors contributing to the disease spread include limited dog vaccination coverage, awareness and access to human rabies vaccine as well as low trust in the PEP. According to the Department of Animal Health (DAH) report in 2015, the country has a large number of unvaccinated free-roaming dogs especially in rural areas.
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    Booklet
    United Against Rabies Forum – Zero by 30
    One Health in Action, December 2020
    2021
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    Rabies threatens nations worldwide, mainly affecting poor and marginalized communities in Africa and Asia. Its economic impact is estimated to be over USD 8.6 billion per year. If no new action is taken, a million people will die from rabies by 2030. FAO, OIE, and WHO have been committed to controlling and eliminating of human deaths from canine rabies since 2011, and in 2018 published “Zero by 30: The Global Strategic Plan to Eliminate Human Deaths from Dog-Mediated Rabies by 2030.” United Against Rabies (UAR) Forum is formed as a platform for stakeholders to work together and advance their collective efforts to achieve Zero by 30. The UAR Forum will bring organizations from all sectors including public and animal health specialists, One Health specialists, civil society, research and academic institutions, and the private sector as partners in this collaboration. FAO, OIE, and WHO leadership announced the UAR Forum at an online event in September 2020. The UAR Forum meeting included a wide range of stakeholders and speakers discussing the impact of rabies and its role as a model One Health challenge. The meeting included three technical expert panel sessions with contributions and questions from participants around the world. The ideas and suggestions raised through the discussions identified the priority action areas and activities to be addressed by UAR Forum working groups over the next 12 to 18 months in order to progress to the global goal of Zero by 30.
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    Project
    Strengthening Capacity towards Rabies Elimination in Asia - TCP/RAS/3708 2023
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    Rabies is a major global public health issue, which is currently endemic in more than 150 countries in the world. Although it is a preventable disease, it kills an estimated 59 000 persons each year. In Asia, dogs are the main mediators of rabies, and traction animals and people are particularly susceptible to canine-mediated infestation. Most human and animal rabies occur in rural and impoverished areas, where there is a continued lack of awareness, or access to rabies vaccines. In this context, rabies epidemics in agricultural areas have significant impacts on livestock production and food security. The rabies situation in Bangladesh is considered endemic, and the dog population is estimated at 1.6 million. Between 1996 and 2017, a total of 366 village-level outbreaks in animals were reported in Bhutan, mainly in the southern region close to the border with India. In Nepal, authorities are also concerned with the epidemiology and impact of the zoonotic disease; however, limited in-country research is currently conducted. In addition, dog-mediated rabies incidences are the vast majority in Sri Lanka, with 20 to 30 induced human deaths annually.

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