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Land use and land cover changes and the link to land degradation, Ethiopia

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Article
    Projection modeling-based geospatial analysis of land use-land cover change at Hasdeo River Watershed, Chhattisgarh, India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The land-use change in the Hasdeo River watershed has been observed with all its subwatersheds. The changing patterns may portend localized impairment to forest and agricultural watershed. In this study, Land-use land-cover (LULC) change was modeled using terrset modeling software. The Hasdeo river watershed (geographical extent of 10,396.373 km2) is a part of the Mahanadi River basin in Chhattisgarh, India. Hasdeo River originates from Sonhat (Koriya district, Chhattisgarh, India) and is submerged into the river Mahanadi. It flows in the stretch of 330 km from north to south direction. This river has eight subwatersheds with rich forest diversity and perennial water resources. IRS-1D & P6 LISS3 images from the years 2000 and 2013 were used to investigate the LULC pattern. This has been used for the prediction of LULC change patterns for the years 2035 and 2050 based on the Markov model. The result of the project LULC map for the year 2000-2035 and 2000-2050 shows that the dense forest area will decrease by 12.30% and 15.68% respectively. The settlement area will significantly increase by 20.13% (2035) and 34.90% (2050) and will be the dominant land-use type in the watershed. It shows that population pressure will directly affect forest vegetation and agriculture activities. This study will be helpful for the effective sustainability approach for maintaining the proper LULC pattern of LULC pattern of land-use change in the watershed. This changing pattern will also influence the farming pattern in the catchment area of the Hasdeo River watershed. Keywords: Adaptive and integrated management, Deforestation and forest degradation, Landscape management, Monitoring and data collection, Sustainable forest management ID: 3487496
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    Article
    Effects of land use and land use change on soil properties in northeast rainforest landscapes of Madagascar
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Soil is a major natural resource acting as a key interface between climate and biogeochemical systems. Tavy system or slash-and-burn agriculture influences soil quality and is responsible for releases of carbon stored in the soil. This study aims to evaluate soil properties in each land use and to determine the impact of land use change on these soil properties. The study area was located in an area in the rainforest of northeastern of Madagascar. Soil samples were collected on 135 study sites composed of nine land use types including natural forest, three cropland stages, tree fallow, mixed fallow, grassland and two cash crop plantations (vanilla and coffee). Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (MIRS) was used to estimate organic carbon (C org), total nitrogen (N tot), cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil texture and pH KCl, while available phosphorus (P Olsen), soil bulk density (BD) and soil carbon stock (SOC) for 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm were estimated with conventional methods. At plot scale and at 0-30 cm, soil in the study area relevant highly variability. Statistical analysis shows that land use change in tavy system contributes significantly to this variability with a p-value <0.001 for P Olsen, C org and N tot, p-value < 0.01 for pH KCl and p-value < 0.05 for CEC and BD. Soil nutrients (P Olsen, C org and N tot) decrease during cultivation period and increase during fallow periods. The CEC and pH KCl were stable but decline rapidly at the grassland stage. SOC for both depths declines over two periods: after the first cropland and the third cycle of cropland after deforestation. The presence of tree vegetation in cash crops (vanilla and coffee) maintains a mean value of soil properties. The results presented in this study will be useful for forest landscape management and will allow the integration of the soil pool in the accounting of the SOC flow in the implementation of REDD+. Keywords: Agriculture, Biodiversity conservation, Climate change, Deforestation and forest degradation, Landscape management ID: 3483094
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Land decline in Land-Rich Africa
    A creeping disaster in the making
    2008
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    The objective of this study was to identify areas of land degradation in sub‐Saharan Africa as observed from space by tracking the greenness of the vegetation signal expressed as Normalize Differenced Vegetation Index (NDVI). A series of additional databases was used, and, through a step‐wise amalgamation of these, conclusions were drawn about the type of (agro) ecosystems under threat. The datasets (based on 8x8 km2 pixels) of weather and NDVI (as a proxy for net primary productivity of the land) were averaged annually from monthly observations over the last two decades of the 20th century. This is likely to have captured reduced agricultural productivity as well as loss in native vegetation cover. The logical framework to analyse and interpret the dynamics of the vegetation cover in sub‐Saharan Africa (SSA) presented here allows for easy re‐assessment as better of more data become available.

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