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Missing the food from the woods: the case of Soliga tribes of Western Ghats, India

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Utilization of Tribal Ethnobotanicals for control of mosquito and mosquito borne diseases and Covid herbal mask and sanitizer for the livelihood ofIrular tribes Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India 2022
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    The Irular are a Dravidian ethnic group inhabiting the Indian states of Tamil Nadu and they are facing many problems with mosquitoes, which are transmitting Malaria, dengue and filariasis etc. The tribal (Irular) plants, Phyllanthus emblica and Artemisia pallens from Western Ghats, Tamilnadu, India have been used the preparation of mosquito control agents. An effective mosquito larvicide and bio-mosquito coil has been prepared by use of above herbals to establish a powerful knockdown effect against larvae and adult mosquitoes, when compared with marketed synthetic products. A Mosquito coil (0.6 cm thickness) was prepared manually and shade dried and it has been demonstrated to tribal people. In laboratory conditions, the herbal formulations were found to possess toxicity against young instars (I, II, III, and IV) dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. Field trials have been conducted at the breeding sites of mosquitoes at stagnant water bodies and insect pests at the Agricultural forest ecosystem at tribal settlement at Nilgiris and Maruthamalai Hills. Bioassays have also been conducted against non-target organisms such as copepods, Mesocyclops aspericornis, Guppy fish, Poecilia reticulata and earthworm, Eudrilus eugeniae species. Herbal masks (covid-19) were prepared by infusion of herbal extract through Ayurvastra technique, and it has been demonstrated to the tribal community for their use for the mosquito repellent and as Covid facial masks. Less alcoholic and special herbal covid mask spray have also been made with herbals (neem, ginger, clove, turmeric, tulsi). The nanoformulations of herbal extract showed a potent antiplasmodial activities against CQ-resistant (CQ-r) and CQ-sensitive (CQ-s) strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Anti Dengue with moderate cytotoxicity was detected on Vero cells post-treatment. Formulations were tested for antimicrobial activities and it can be used as eco-friendly bioinsecticides and alternate herbal medicine for tribals. Keywords: Human Health and Well-being, Innovation, Adaptive and Integrated Management, Social Protection, Zoonotic diseases ID: 3644418
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    Degradation of tribal forest-ecosystem and food insecurity among Kutia Kondh tribe of Odisha - a major concern in the 21st century
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Tribal People look after their forest in such a way no one can’t as they depend solely on forest for their livelihood, also they worship their forest as God. One such tribe called Kutia Kondha of Odisha (specially located in Kalahandi & Bolangir districts) protect the forest since ages and due to their indigenous agricultural practice(Podu cultivation) they are able to grow nutritious grains and other food. Their practice helps to conserve the agro ecosystem as well as forest ecosystem, but due to intervention of Government and other agencies they fear their forest will no longer sustain and their livelihood is in stake so also their food security because of massive Teak plantation programme. When the whole World is focusing on Food security measures, at this juncture the tribal forest ecosystem on which the tribal people depends for the NTFP for their sustenance is being destroyed in the name of “Development” which is the dark side of Sustainability campaign. Scientifically, due to such programme the nutritious grains like Millets which are majorly grown by tribal can’t be grown henceforth which is the major concern as they are now start eating poisonous food i.e the underground portion of certain wild plants. This causes severe health hazards to these tribal people. In a survey it is found that about 78% of tribal population is suffering from hunger related complications and about 82% children are suffering from various food poison and other unknown diseases which sometimes lead to premature death. Also about 92% of tribal population (forest dwellers) has now changed their food habit due to non availability of land for their indigenous cultivation practices which is another factor for their food insecurity. In conclusion the coordination of 3 “E” is important as lack of proper education and less access to ecology will lead to a degraded economy. Keywords: Climate change, Food systems Deforestation and forest degradation, Human health and wellbeing, Sustainable forest management ID: 3654134
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    Integrating adaptive management strategies for coping with climate change impacts on farming households in forest communities of Nigeria
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Most Nigerians depend on natural ecosystems such as forests, for extensive rain-fed farming and short fallow periods. Forest communities interact with their ecosystems for income, food, nutritional security and livelihood sustenance. It is important to determine the response of these communities to climate change vulnerability through modified livelihood activities. A multi-stage sampling procedure was used to assess the perceived impact of climate variability on farming communities in major ecosystems (rainforest, savannah and mangrove) of Nigeria. Using focus group discussions, we identified perceived impacts, traditional adaptive measures and new technologies that communities were adopting to cope with climate change. Over the last 30 years, there were perceived shifts in the rainfall patterns, durations and intensities with negative effects on rain-fed agriculture. Planting operations and cropping calendars had been altered, especially in the savanna, which had the highest incidence of drought and flooding. Climate variability negatively affected food production and available land for farming. Livelihoods most impacted were farming, hunting, fishing, timber and non-timber forest products’ collection. High temperatures, illegal logging and charcoal production were the most important environmental drivers of climate change. While poor governance, poverty and unemployment were the key political and economic elements. Local adaptation strategies included crop rotation, mixed cropping, diversification of trade, water conservation and adjustment of planting calendars based on traditional weather forecast. Sustainable adaptation strategies required included provision of credit facilities, affordable insurance policy; increased supply of drought and disease resistant crops; road networks, favourable forestry regulation; and improved climate information systems. Farmers were struggling with adaptive strategies and required external assistance to cope with climate change. Keywords: adaptive and integrated management; climate change; agriculture; sustainable forest management; food systems. ID: 3474255

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