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Utilization of Tribal Ethnobotanicals for control of mosquito and mosquito borne diseases and Covid herbal mask and sanitizer for the livelihood ofIrular tribes Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India









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    Covid 19 – How forestry can respond to a pandemic- An example from Indonesia
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Since the beginning of 2020, the world has been firmly in the grip of the Covid-19 virus. In Indonesia, the first patient was reported in early March 2020. The subsequent restrictions imposed to prevent the spread of the virus affect the daily lives of all people. Apart from the health sector, some areas of the economic sector are being hit hard. Forest Program III - Sulawesi (FP III) used its presence in Central Sulawesi for additional efforts to reduce the economic impacts of the pandemic for the local communes. Central Sulawesi is one of the ten poorest provinces in Indonesia; according to the official statistic data (BPJS; 04/2021) in the province the percentage of people in poverty increased from 10% (12/2019) to 15% (12/2020). FP III provided funds for the planting of fast-growing species (gmelina sp, moringa sp., musaseae sp. etc.) and herbals (ginger, turmeric, etc.). Following project`s approach, the villagers received financial incentives (US$ 0,14/seedling planted) after the planting was carried out. In the meantime, farmers have long since harvested herbals and fruits. With this activity, carried out specifically to contribute to the Covid-19 pandemic response, farmers have made a positive contribution to the environment and health in many ways. The planting of fast-growing species improves the soil nutrients, creates a microclimate, reduces the risk of erosion, and enhances genetic conservation efforts. In addition, the planting of the selected species rapidly contributes to the health (nutrition) and improves the economic situation of the population trough the payment of incentives and because people have additional products to sell on the market) In total, FP III supported the planting of 207,211 fast-growing tree species and 64,606 herbals. The planting was conducted between June and August 2020. Conclusion: This fast reaction on the impacts of the pandemic turns out as a win-win solution for all beneficiaries and contributes to a better environment. Keywords: Covid-19, Health, Livelihood, Economy, Ecology ID: 3485647
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    Credit For Fisherfolk : The Experience In Adirampattinam Tamil Nadu, India - BOBP/WP/38 1986
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    One of the prime needs of small-scale fisherfolk is credit. Under a “coastal village development project” initiated by the BOBP in Adirampattinam, Tamil Nadu, India, in 1981, the credit needs of fisherfolk were determined and a scheme was formulated under which a nationalised bank would lend Rs. 1,000 each to 100 fishermen for the purchase of nets. Fish marketing loans were given to fisher-women by a voluntary organization, the Working Women’s Forum (WWF) and also by the Fisherwomen’s Extension Service of the Fisheries Department. The project and its activities have been described in an earlier paper (BOBP/WP/1 9 — “Coastal village development in four fishing communities of Adirampattinam, Tamil Nadu, India” by F. W. Blase). The present paper evaluates the impact of the loans for fisherfolk (both project loans for fishermen and those provided for fisherwomen by the WWF and the Fisheries Department.) The paper studies the usefulness of the loans and the rate of loan repayment. It at tempts to analyse the success of the strategy of “group formation” for loan distribution and for development. The Coastal Village Development Project and the loan evaluation study which is the subject of this report are activities of “Development of Small-Scale Fisheries in the Bay of Bengal,” a project of the BOBP. It started in 1979. It is funded by SIDA (Swedish International Development Authority) and executed by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations). Its main goal s are to develop, demonstrate and promote appropriate technologies and methodologies to improve the conditions of small-scale fisherfolk in member countries — Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and Thailand.
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    Missing the food from the woods: the case of Soliga tribes of Western Ghats, India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Forest dependent indigenous communities have traditionally fulfilled their dietary requirements from a range of locally available food resources. For Soliga tribes of Biligirirangana Hills (BR Hills) in India’s Western Ghats, gathering of wild berries, tubers and mushrooms, shifting cultivation of millets, legumes and vegetables within the forests and small game hunting have habitually supported food and subsistence needs. Over the years, the traditional food practices have transformed drastically, driven by conservation policies that resulted in the resettlement of Soligas to forest peripheries, a ban on traditional fire practices and consequent colonization of forests by invasive species, altering the forest composition and leading to decline of wild food resources. We trace the trajectory of changes in Soliga food systems using a combination of methodologies ranging from a comprehensive literature review and expert interviews to household surveys in three Soliga settlements in BR Hills. Our study reveals the diminishing importance of forests as source of food and income and shift from food crops to cash crops in farms in forest peripheries to avert crop raids by wildlife. Dependence on forest produce collection and farming was found to vary based on the allocation of tribal land rights and the location of the settlements with respect to the forest type and availability of markets. While existing literature and expert respondents recognize the changing forest dynamics and the immense ecological knowledge of Soligas that complements forest conservation efforts, the nexus between forests, farming and health and nutrition of the tribe was hardly appreciated. Improved access to public food distribution system and evolving cultural preferences has increased the dependence on external markets for food. We further discuss the repercussions of these transitions on nutritional security and food sovereignty of the community. Keywords: Food systems, Human health and well-being, Biodiversity conservation, Agriculture, Sustainable Forest management ID: 3483228

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