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Seafood traceability for fisheries compliance: country-level support for catch documentation schemes













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    Beyond regulatory compliance – Seafood traceability benefits and success cases 2020
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    Since the mid-1990s, traceability has become a popular concept in industrial logistics, regardless of the production regime and type of product. Implementing traceability systems across the food supply chain is seen as crucial for increasing food quality and safety, for optimizing production or for documenting sustainability. However, implementation of traceability systems in the seafood sector seems to be stagnating. Against this backdrop, the main objective of this study is to define and analyse in detail seafood traceability benefits related to regulatory compliance, supply chain management improvements, market access facilitation, and risk mitigation. To support this objective, the study collects and compiles policy incentives from governments and industry associations to encourage the establishment of company seafood traceability. In addition, this study updates information regarding existing traceability standards and norms serving various purposes in the seafood sector. Based on a thorough analysis of speciality literature and the extensive experience of the authors, this study formulates several recommendations that are relevant for a wide range of stakeholders in the seafood sector.
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    Good practices guidelines (GCP) on national seafood traceability systems 2018
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    There is little doubt that IUU fishing has a negative impact on the economic, social and ecological attributes of fisheries and this affects food security. Specifically, illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing has contributed to a reduction in food supply, losses of livelihood and state revenue, diminishing fish stocks, and damaging ecosystems, with the most devastating effects felt in developing countries by virtue of their greater vulnerability. These illegal activities form a complex web – from illegal fishing to illegal trade, and persistent catching from unsustainably fished stocks – with the overall objective of making a high profit from illegally caught fish. Members of the FAO Committee on Fisheries have agreed on the need for good practice guidelines for national fishery authorities to prevent, deter and eliminate illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing through the effective implementation of flag state responsibilities. The guidelines are wide-ranging and address the purpose and principles, as well as the scope of application, performance assessment criteria and cooperation between states. They are expected to provide a valuable tool to strengthen the compliance of flag states in terms of their international duties and obligations regarding the flagging and control of fishing vessels.
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    Design options for the development of tuna catch documentation schemes 2016
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    Catch documentation schemes (CDS) have been a topic of debate for more than 16 years, and continue to mean different things to different people. This paper clarifies the nature of CDS and what they can achieve, and identifies the factors to be considered in the design of such schemes as a management and monitoring, control and surveillance tool in tuna fisheries. This paper was developed in the framework of the Common Oceans ABNJ Tuna Project funded by the Global Environment Facility and impleme nted by the FAO. The Common Oceans ABNJ Tuna Project harnesses the efforts of a large and diverse array of partners, including the five tuna RFMOs, governments, inter-governmental organizations, non-governmental organizations and private sector. The Project aims to achieve responsible, efficient and sustainable tuna production and biodiversity conservation in the areas beyond national jurisdiction focusing on three thematic areas, namely; improving management, combatting IUU fishing, and pro tecting biodiversity.A small-scale survey covering catch documentation schemes at the Brussels Seafood Show in April 2015 sampled feedback from the industry on these schemes in relation to tuna fisheries; some of the results are referred to in this paper in support of design option proposals.

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