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Pesticide management










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Gestion des pesticides dans le secteur de la banane 2017
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    Les pesticides sont utilisés de manière intensive pour contrôler les ravageurs et maladies dans les bananeraies, en particulier dans celles destinées à l'exportation tout au long de l'année. Les bananes sont d'autant plus sensibles aux infestations qu'elles sont cultivées pour la plupart dans des régions tropicales, créant des conditions favorables aux organismes nuisibles. On utilise les pesticides pour contrôler différents parasites de la banane, dont la cercosporiose noire, capable de réduire les rendements de 35% à 50% dans les plantations. La contamination causée par l'utilisation intensive de produits agrochimiques dans les monocultures reste un défi. Les inquiétudes concernant les risques liés à l'utilisation de pesticides se reflètent de plus en plus dans la demande du marché. Pour les producteurs, cette évolution appelle un changement dans les systèmes de production et de commercialisation qui les conduit à approfondir leurs connaissances techniques tout en maintenant la viabi lité économique des exploitations bananières. Il est donc important de limiter autant que possible l'utilisation des pesticides et d'en assurer une bonne gestion avant, pendant et après l’application pour pouvoir réduire les risques sociaux et environnementaux qui leur sont associés.
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    Pesticides contamination and exposure reduction 2022
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    Lebanon suffers from land erosion and soil degradation (e.g. alkalinity, salinity, and moisture deficit), with 39 percent of the Lebanese territory highly exposed to land degradation (UNCCD 2018). Soil nutrition and plant protection are mismanaged with Lebanon showing some of the highest per hectare use of fertilizers (331 kg/ha) and pesticides (7 kg/ha) in the world (FAOSTAT 2020; MoA 2020). Chemical pesticides control plant pests and therefore reduce yield losses; however, this comes at a heavy cost to the environment and to the animal and human health. In Lebanon, The Phytopharmacy Department of the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) has registered hundreds of chemical pesticides. All legally registered pesticides have labels that identify the Trade Name, active ingredient(s), formulation type, the intended use, and the application interval and frequency. In spite of this, most farmers seldom abide by the recommended usage frequency and dosage, and often double the recommended rate thinking that they are “guaranteeing” the effectiveness of the pesticide as they say. Furthermore, in many instances, sales engineers actually advise farmers to spray more than one pesticide of the same class or possessing similar mode of action, leading to an ineffective overuse.
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    Preventing the spread and introduction of banana fusarium wilt disease Tropical race 4 (TR4)
    Guide for travelers
    2020
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    Banana is an important crop for food security and ensuring the livelihoods of approximately 400 million people who depend on the crop either as a staple food or source of income, particularly in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Plant pests and diseases can seriously affect agricultural production and livelihood of rural people. Fusarium wilt of banana is one of the key examples of crop devastation by a plant disease. This disease brought the banana export industry almost to a halt in the 20th century when the popular banana variety Gros Michel was devastated in Central America. The sector was saved by the introduction of the Cavendish variety, which is resistant to race 1 of the fungus. However, Cavendish bananas are now succumbing to a new, highly aggressive strain of the Fusarium wilt fungus, Tropical race 4 (TR4). Fusarium wilt TR4 threatens almost all banana producers, posing the greatest risks to countries producing Cavendish bananas in monoculture plantations in Asia, Australia, Africa, the Near East, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Cavendish bananas, which constitute approximately half of the bananas grown globally are highly susceptible to TR4, but other dessert banana varieties grown in these regions are also susceptible. Once established in a banana plantation, the fungus can survive in the soil for decades with its chlamydospores, even without banana plants. Scientific reports indicate the presence of TR4 in numerous countries in Asia (China – mainland and Taiwan Province), India, Indonesia, Israel, Jordan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Malaysia, Myanmar,

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