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Towards a Policy that Pairs Microcredit and Micro-Insurance Tools. What Impacts on the Fight Against Poverty and Risk Management? Lessons Learned from Experiences in India and Madagascar. Policy Brief

Thematic Overview. EASYPol Module 206










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    Book (stand-alone)
    Report of the Expert Workshop on Guidelines for Micro-finance, Credit and Insurance for Small-scale Fisheries in Asia, Bangkok, Thailand, 7-9 May 2019
    Bangkok, Thailand, 7-9 May 2019
    2019
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    The Expert Workshop on Guidelines for Micro-finance, Credit and Insurance for Small-scale Fisheries in Asia was held in Bangkok, Thailand in the period 7-9 May 2019. Rural finance, insurance and fisheries experts from Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, Thailand, UK, Canada and the USA met to discuss ways to improve the access to financial services for small-scale fishers in Asia. The workshop aimed to discuss successful finance and insurance programmes in Asia for small-scale fishers, finalize practical guidelines in support of better access to financial services, and design a capacity building programme for increasing the provision of finance and insurance services to small-scale fisheries. The workshop was attended by 32 experts and was organized by the Asia-Pacific Rural and Agricultural Credit Association (APRACA) in close collaboration with FAO. The insurance and credit guidelines prepared will facilitate the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Poverty Eradication and Food Security (SSF Guidelines), as well as contribute towards achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 14. Access to finance and insurance services will enable the small-scale fishers to invest in more responsible fishing operations and technologies, reduce overfishing, contribute to fisheries management and implement climate change adaptation measures. The micro-finance, credit and insurance guidelines for small-scale fisheries have been endorsed by APRACA members in June 2019, and implementation throughout the Asian region is promoted.
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    Review of the current state of world aquaculture insurance 2006
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    Due to the rapidly changing production processes in aquaculture worldwide (e.g. submergible cages, sea ranching, intensification, aquaponics and recirculation systems), which sometimes increase vulnerability to disease outbreaks and which generally require large investments from aquaculturists, over the last decades the demand for insurance to share and cover the risks involved has increased significantly within the aquaculture sector. Risk management is increasingly gaining attention within the aquaculture sector, which is reflected in the development and increasing implementation of Better Management Practices (BMPs), Codes of Conduct and Codes of Good Practice, Standard Operational Procedures, certification and traceability. Aquaculture insurance is one of the tools used in aquaculture risk management, but there is considerable ignorance within the aquaculture industry about its availability, the process of obtaining insurance cover, especially on aquaculture stock mortality, and th e constraints to insurers providing its services. A review study was carried out in early 2005 and covered the main aquaculture-producing countries worldwide. Seven syntheses (China, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, sub-Saharan Africa and Oceania) were prepared, discussing the specificities of their situation with regard to aquaculture insurance. A summary of the syntheses was made, together with conclusions and clear recommendations at various levels to increase the contribution of aquaculture insurance to the sustainable management and development of the aquaculture sector. Some of the main conclusions of the review study are the following: the demand for aquaculture insurance has never been as high as it is now; there is a widening gap between the demand for and supply of aquaculture insurance in the world; the number of aquaculture insurance policies in force is estimated at around 8 000 worldwide; some regions (sub-Saharan Africa, South America and large parts of Asia) are barely covered by aquaculture insurance services; aquaculture insurance policies in force in Asia are generally of the “named perils” type, while those in other regions are often of the “all risks” type; while the range of species and culture systems covered under aquaculture policies worldwide is diverse, many insurers only focus on a small number of traditional aquaculture species and are reluctant to include “new” species and culture systems; reinsurance possibilities are important both for introducing aquaculture insurance activities in a country and for developing and disseminating the service; the underwriting experiences of aquaculture insurance companies largely differ among companies and regions and from year to year; since the start of the new millennium it seems that experiences are improving and that aquaculture insurance activity is becoming profitable; mutual insurance schemes in aquaculture are still insignificant; the lack of enabling policies and regulatory framew orks for aquaculture and fisheries insurance is negatively affecting the development of insurance services and the sustainable development of the aquaculture sector; and asymmetric information, moral hazard and adverse selection remain among the major constraints to undertake aquaculture insurance activities for international and national insurance companies, which negatively influence the results of new entrants in the aquaculture insurance sector during the first few years of business.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Guidelines for micro-finance and credit services in support of small-scale fisheries in Asia
    A handbook for finance and fisheries stakeholders
    2019
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    These Guidelines for increasing access of small-scale fisheries to credit and microfinance services in Asia have been developed to support the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines). The purpose of these guidelines is fourfold, i.e. to: • Increase awareness about the financial service needs of small-scale fishers (SSF) for more sustainable and inclusive access to finance; • Guide policy and decision makers in the Asia-Pacific region and elsewhere, to help introduce and incentivize financial services to small-scale fishers, with the ultimate objective to encourage investment in the industry and by doing so influence and strengthen sustainability, ecological and economic viability of these fisheries; • Build capacity among financial service providers, fisherfolk organizations, NGOs, and concerned government agencies, to design and implement financial service products and programmes that suit the needs of small-scale fishing communities and enhance social protection; and • Promote financial services that incentivize and reward a responsible and sustainable conduct of fishing, fish processing and marketing operations. The document commences by laying out the background and context, purpose and target audience of these Guidelines. It describes why microfinance and credit are important for small scale fisheries and why many small-scale fishers are not currently financed, which includes a discussion of risks. The Guidelines suggest entry and leverage points for actors interested in supporting the access of financial services for SSFs and compares agriculture (smallholders) and SSF business characteristics. The Guidelines identify a range

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