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Zimbabwe’s Harmonized Cash Transfer Programme: 12-month impact report on productive activities and labour allocation












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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Zimbabwe’s Harmonized Social Cash Transfer Programme: impacts on productive activities and labour allocation 2015
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    Zimbabwe’s Harmonized Social Cash Transfer Programme (HSCT) is implemented by the Ministry of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare. The programme is jointly funded by the Government of Zimbabwe, the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF); the latter also provides technical and implementation support. The HSCT is an unconditional social cash transfer that targets food-poor and labour-constrained households. To be eligible for the programme, a household must be living below the food poverty line and unable to meet its most urgent basic needs; and face household labour constraints. Households are considered labour-constrained if they i) have no ablebodied member between the ages of 18 and 59; ii) have one able-bodied member between the ages of 18 and 59 who has to care for more than three dependents; or iii) have a dependency ratio between 2 and 3 with a severely disabled or chronically sick household member who requires intensive care. The HSCT, which was launched in 2012, initially covered ten districts and included 16 637 households. By March 2014, the programme had expanded to 20 districts and included 55 509 households. Efforts continue to expand the programme to reach all 65 districts of Zimbabwe, an estimated coverage of around 250 000 households.
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    Document
    Evaluating local general equilibrium impacts of Zimbabwe’s Harmonized Social Cash Transfer Programme (HSCT) 2014
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    The Harmonized Social Cash Transfer (HSCT) is an unconditional cash transfer introduced in 2011 by the Ministry of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare (MPSLSW) in order to strengthen the purchasing power of ultra-poor households who are labour constrained through cash transfers. The objectives of the programme include enabling recipient households to increase consumption above the poverty line, reduce the number of ultra-poor households and help beneficiaries avoid risky coping strategies such as child labour and early marriage. Moreover, the programme is expected to lead to improved nutritional status, health and education outcomes, as well as a reduction in violence. As of March 2014, 55 509 households in 20 districts had been enrolled, covering 247 645 individuals. Local economy-wide impact evaluation (LEWIE) simulation methods are used to assess the likely impacts of cash transfers on the local economy. When the Harmonized Social Cash Transfer programme gives money to benefic iary households, they spend it, buying goods and services. As this cash swirls around within wards and districts, it creates benefits for non-recipient households as well who may provide the goods and services purchased by beneficiary households. This study finds that the Zimbabwe HSCT generates a total income multiplier of 1.73 in nominal terms with a confidence interval of 1.42 to 2.00. Each dollar of transfer has the potential to generate 1.73 dollars of total income within the project area.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Productive impact of Malawi’s Social Cash Transfer Programme – midline report 2016
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    This report evaluates the productive impact of the Malawi Social Cash Transfer Programme (SCTP). The report uses data collected from a randomized experimental design impact evaluation to analyse the impact of the SCTP on household decision-making over agricultural production, labour supply, the accumulation of private assets and other income generating activities.

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