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Increasing Quantity and Quality of Rice for Small-Scale Farmers in Myanmar - TCP/MYA/3504










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    Project
    Strengthening Capacities of Smallholder Rice Producers in Iringa District - GCP/URT/148/EC 2021
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    Agriculture is a prominent sector for the United Republic of Tanzania’s economic development, contributing around 24 percent of GDP, and employing 65 percent of the working population. In this context, rice is the second most important crop in the country, and is mostly grown by farmers as a cash crop for local and regional markets. However, farmers have difficulty accessing important extension, storage and financial services, which would enable their inclusion in the growing agricultural markets. The challenges to access these and other services are even greater for women and youth smallholder farmers, who lack ownership of major means of production, such as land. Against this background, the project aimed to increase rice value chain competitiveness and reduce post harvest losses in Iringa region, by improving managerial capacity, creating sustainable rice value chains with public private partnerships, and enhancing post harvest handling, storage and management, among other things.
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    Present and future markets for fish and fish products from small-scale fisheries - Case studies from Asia, Africa and Latin America. (Available online only) 2008
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    At the twenty-sixth session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries, FAO was requested to identify how trade in fish and fish products could further benefit small-scale fisheries and generate additional income and employment within the sector. Following this request, case studies were carried out in selected Latin American, African and Asian countries to study the importance of small-scale fisheries trade and identify opportunities for better integration into regional and international fish trade. The findings and recommendations of the case studies were presented and discussed at the tenth session of the FAO Sub-Committee on Fish Trade, held in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, from 30 May to 2 June 2006. In the countries studied, the contribution of the small-scale fisheries sector to the total marine catch was significant and ranged from 70 to 95 percent. The studies show that products from small-scale fisheries are largely focused on the domestic market. In Africa regional trade in small-scale fisheries products was found to be very important for meeting the protein requirements of poor people. Women are actively involved in fish processing and marketing and also participate in capture fisheries in coastal areas and estuaries as well as in other forms of harvesting of aquatic organisms. Their involvement results in increased well-being of their households since womens income is largely spent on food and childrens education. Study findings suggest that women can gain from increasing trade opportunities through their involvement in value adding activities and enterprises. The studies identified several avenues for better integration of small-scale fisheries into regional and international fish trade. Among them are product diversification, value addition, improvement of product quality and the access to new markets. However, a number of constraints need to be overcome before this can be achieved. Post-harvest losses due to poor infrastructure and lack of sto rage and transportation facilities need to be reduced and knowledge of proper fish handling methods needs to be improved. While products for export are meeting high quality standards, products for domestic and regional markets are often processed using substandard hygienic methods. Small-scale fisheries are also excluded from international markets because of the costs and difficulties encountered when trying to comply with international standards and those imposed by supermarket chains and other customers. The studies suggest that efforts should be aimed at improving facilities for preserving fish onboard, at the establishment of hygienic fish landing sites, increasing storage facilities and the supply of ice as well as improving roads, which connect fishing communities to markets. Equally important are the improvement of technical support and extension services to enable fishing communities to access appropriate technologies and information and training on quality improvement, p roper fish handling procedures and storage, product diversification, value addition as well as on packaging. Fishing communities should also be assisted in assessing their fisheries and aquatic resources and identifying those that have potential for trade in the domestic, regional and international markets. Small-scale fishers and processors can get better prices for their products by shortening the fish supply chain and increasing their bargaining and lobbying power. In this regard, the fo rmation of marketing cooperatives should be encouraged and existing associations of small-scale fishers and processors should be strengthened by providing support for institution building. There is also a need to raise awareness among microfinance institutions regarding the needs of the small-scale fisheries sector for credit and savings services.
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    Project
    Support for the Reduction of Post-Harvest Losses in Yardlong Beans, Papaya and Other Commodities in Suriname - TCP/SUR/3702 2022
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    One of the priorities of the Government of Suriname is intensifying agricultural trade relations with the Caribbean region Improving harvest practices and post harvest handling, transportation and storage infrastructure, and introducing and enforcing grades and standards for agricultural produce are among the main challenges for the sector, above all for intra and extra regional trade Suriname has identified post harvest loss reduction as a priority area requiring the strengthened application of technology innovation, research and development Post harvest losses are largely the result of knowledge, organizational and logistics gaps, including poor coordination between production and market actors, improper handling, transportation and packaging, poor storage and weak rural infrastructure These gaps result in diminished returns to producers, reduced availability of commodities for local markets and missed opportunities to enter export markets Export market access requires transformation of the marketing system for fruits and vegetables Fruit and vegetable producers need to shift from a production oriented to a market oriented focus Many small producers and other stakeholders of the fruit and vegetable sector are unaware of the quality and packaging requirements associated with specific market opportunities and risk being marginalized as a result.

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