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Developing a Comprehensive Livestock Master Plan (LMP) for Rwanda - TCP/RWA/3605









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    Book (series)
    Farmer field schools for small-scale livestock producers - A guide for decision makers on improving livelihoods 2018
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    Livestock Farmer Field Schools (FFSs) are “schools without walls” where groups of small-scale livestock producers test, validate, and adapt good agricultural and marketing practices that help them increase their production sustainably and to improve their, and their families’, livelihoods. Over the past two decades, Livestock FFSs have been implemented/supported by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and other development stakeholders in a wide range of environments and livestock production systems including pastoralism and agro-pastoralism, dairying, poultry production, integrated rice-duck systems, rabbit production, pig production, beekeeping, beef production, camel production and small ruminant production. Today, the FFS approach is used to spur livestock growth across developing regions, with governments, NGOs, the private sector and other stakeholders increasingly interested in applying it. This guidance document was prepared to help decision-makers involved in policy formulation and programme planning to: (i) gain a basic knowledge of the FFS approach, with emphasis on animal production, health and marketing; (ii) learn about the contribution of FFS to the livelihoods of livestock-dependent communities in different contexts; (iii) recognize the conditions required for the successful implementation of Livestock FFSs; and (iv) comprehend the potential of the FFS approach in a wide range of livestock production systems and socio-economic settings.
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    Project
    Mainstreaming Implementation Instruments into the Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Program (CAADP) - TCP/RAF/3610 2020
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    Given that agriculture is an important driving economic force of all African economies, many national, subregional and regional cooperation efforts on sustainable agricultural development have been at the top of the agendas of African countries as they work towards the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, especially in relation to tackling the continent’s high rates of poverty and food insecurity and malnutrition. Acute and chronic malnutrition among children, in particular, represent considerable socioeconomic hardships and forgone opportunities for sustainable economic growth, shared prosperity and the right to food for all. Against this backdrop, the African Union (AU) Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP), established by the AU Assembly of Heads of State and Government through the 2003 Maputo Declaration on Agriculture and Food Security in Africa, was developed to improve food security and nutrition and increase incomes throughout Africa’s largely agriculture-based economies. The CAADP aims to reposition agriculture at the centre of Africa’s development agenda and has, since 2003, enabled countries to address key transformational issues embedded in, or closely linked to, agriculture. Many countries have improved agricultural development planning and policy design processes, with over 40 of them implementing National Agriculture and Food Security Investment Plans (NAFSIPs). Likewise, Regional Economic Communities (RECs) are adding value to national initiatives through the formulation and implementation of Regional Agriculture and Food Security Investment Plans (RAFSIPs). The CAADP is recognized as the flagship strategy guiding agricultural development in Africa, tailored to and driven by each country. Even though new investment streams have been identified and average public expenditure for agriculture doubled since the adoption of the CAADP, not all countries follow this trend. Private investment for agricultural development has been constrained by insufficient enabling environments and intersectoral coordination of agricultural, trade and industrial development plans to incentivize investments. In addition, lending risks associated with the uncertainty and variability of agricultural outputs and incomes, insecure land tenure issues, gender inequality in access to credit and disincentives to lend to rural, unemployed youth have prevented the African agricultural development agenda from being more inclusive. Low investment in agricultural research and slow adoption of modern farming, mechanization and post-harvest technologies have impacted productivity, which has grown at half the rate of agriculturalsectors in other developing regions.
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    Policy brief
    Small livestock development in Rwanda: enhancing the policy environment for pig and poultry value chains 2023
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    In recent years, much has been accomplished to develop the small livestock subsector in Rwanda. The Livestock Master Plan (LMP) 2017–2022 and the Fourth Strategic Plan for Agricultural Transformation (PSTA 4) 2018–2024 have proposed and attracted investments that have improved productivity of small livestock value chains including better piggery and poultry genetics, feeds and health services. However, this subsector still faces many problems related to policy and the enabling environment. Those problems were identified by a policy analysis involving stakeholder consultations in September and October 2022 and a national policy dialogue held in November 2022, jointly organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Ministry of Agricultural and Animal Resources (MINAGRI). The study was supported by the European Union under the FAO-led TAP-AIS project “Developing capacities in agricultural innovation systems: scaling up the Tropical Agriculture Platform Framework”. The main problems facing small livestock development in Rwanda include: - insufficient access to affordable, suitable and nutritious animal feeds; - limited or poor market infrastructure and processing facilities for animal products; - limited extension and animal health services to control disease outbreaks; - financial constraints to smallholder farmers’ participation in different small livestock value chains; - insufficient means of transport and logistics services for live animals and animal products; - limited access to improved animal breeds; and - poor links between small livestock farmers, feed producers and animal processing facilities.

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