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Spatial distribution model of phragmanthera plant parasite in Rift Valley Ecoregion of Kenya

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Article
    Validating viability of Melia volkensii seeds stored as extracted seeds or nuts for production of high-quality germplasm in domestication and conservation of dryland tree species
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Development and supply of superior germplasm is important for the promotion of tree planting. Kenya has lost many tree seed sources through deforestation, land degradation, forests encroachment and conversion of agricultural land to housing. Nevertheless, limited access to tree seeds of high quality is the major constraint to sustainable tree production in Kenya and proper information on storability of extracted seeds is lacking. Melia volkensii trees species is highly valued in drylands of Kenya for tremendous roles in social-economic, ecological and environmental protection, and conservation. This experiment aims at determining viability test of Melia seeds stored as nut over period of one year and the resultant effect that they will have on seed germination. Furthermore, the research investigates the conducive environment that would favor storage of Melia seeds in order to improve its viability status. The experiment showed that Melia seeds stored at room temperature and a temperature of 4 degrees centigrade had higher germination capacities compared to Melia seeds stored at a temperature of -20 degrees centigrade. The peak average germination speed was 2.11 with a germination value of 3.99. Significant (p value ≤ 0.001) differences were observed in the germination capacities between Melia stored as seeds and nuts for the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh germinations (p value ≤ 0.05). From the study, Melia stored as seeds at a temperature of 4 degrees centigrade had the highest marginal germination capacity. This study provides the best information for storage and handling of Melia seeds in maintaining its viability. Keywords: Germplasm, viability, conservation, Climate change, dryland species, Melia volkensii ID: 3623818
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    Article
    Promoting Terminalia brownii as a commercial indigenous tree species in drylands, East Africa
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Kenya’s forest cover is estimated at 7.4% of the land mass cover. Forests are important in ensuring biodiversity conservation and providing ecosystem goods and services, improving community livelihoods and national GDP. There is need to enhance afforestation and reforestation programmes to achieve the envisioned 10% tree cover target. However, this effort is constrained by climate change issues arising from unsustainable exploitation of wood for charcoal and firewood leading to the depletion of important tree species such as T. brownii. The domestication of T. brownii under agroforestry systems and other tree planting programmes are constrained by lack of adequate supply of superior and high quality seeds and seedlings, poor silvi-cultural management techniques, low rates of integration into smallholder agroforestry programs, limited knowledge on crop-tree interactions and lack of allometric models to estimate biomass yield and carbon stock. A multidisciplinary research project funded by the National Research Fund (NRF) is ongoing and is geared towards promoting the propagation and regeneration of T. brownii under agroforestry systems in the drylands of Kenya to mitigate climate change. A number of preliminary findings have been reported, such are; (1) Terminalia brownii fruits have mechanical dormancy imposed by the hard samara fruit and that extracted T. brownii seeds record a high percentage of above 80% under warm conditions; (2) germination of T. brownii fruits and seeds are significantly affected by fungal pathogens and insect pests; (3) five variables significantly influence the decision to domesticate T. brownii these are; education level of household head, importance of farm to the household income, access to credit, dependency ratio and intercropping; (4) studies on the spatial distribution and occurrence and development of allometric equation for estimating above and below-ground biomass of T. brownii in the drylands of Kenya are ongoing. Further assessment on growth performance have shown that T. brownii is generally fast growing; can attain an increase in height of (~1.0 m) and DGL (3.0 cm) annually, with significance difference in growth within and between provenances and that the it can withstand many other growth challenges despite the harsh weather conditions. These findings suggest that T. brownii is a promising tree species in agroforestry systems and afforestation in drylands and that there exist genetic variability among the available provenances thus the need to involve more stakeholders in seedling production and to embark on...... Key words: T. brownii, Commercial tree, growth performance, drylands of Kenya ID: 3623166
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    Booklet
    Multilocational dryland species trial in Uganda 2021
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    Many initiatives have supported the rapid expansion of commercial timber and bioenergy plantations in Uganda; but little has been done in dryland areas such as the semi-arid Karamoja sub-region. This has partly been attributed to the fact that establishing tree plantations in dryland areas is a challenge given the high temperatures and low soil moisture, exacerbated by insufficient information about suitable commercial plantation tree species for dryland afforestation and reforestation. There is scanty information on suitable tree species, potential growth rates and suitable silvicultural practices. Commercial plantations have also been affected by the emergence of new pests and diseases, putting at great risk investment in the sector, especially given that most forest plantations are exotic monocultures. Through the Sawlog Production Grant Scheme (SPGS) phase III project, FAO in Uganda collaborated with the National Forestry Resources Research Institute (NaFORRI) to establish trials of dryland tree species at different locations. This brief summarises the findings of the study titled MULTILOCATIONAL DRYLAND SPECIES TRIAL IN UGANDA, which was the result of the collaboration between FAO and NaFORRI. This report will inform strategies and plans for promoting commercial forestry in dryland areas of the country such as Karamoja. NaFORRI is a constituent of the National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO), with the national mandate to undertake research in all aspects of forestry in Uganda. SPGS III is funded by the European Union.

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