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Food security analysis and policies for transition countries







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    Institutional changes for agricultural and rural development in the CEEC and CIS region 2006
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    The paper emphasizes the importance of embedded institutions for the transformation of the agricultural sector and rural economies in the transition countries and identifies and analyses institutional aspects regarding agriculture and rural development common to the transition countries. It focuses on the institutional dimension of reform policies, i.e. on the political economy aspects of the transition process that were decisive for the success or failure of the reforms. The importance of ident ifying the “mental models” of various stakeholders during the transition process is emphasized and the reasons are explored why the transition process in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe has not resulted in a restructuring of the agricultural sector towards family farms as most were expecting. The paper then discusses the role of institutions for the governance of farms, the comparative advantage of farm sizes and the choice of specific legal forms of farms.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    The state of food and agriculture, 2010-2011
    Women in Agriculture: closing the gender gap for development
    2011
    Women make significant contributions to the rural economy in all developing country regions. Their roles OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE differ across regions, yet they consistently have less access than men to the resources and opportunities they need to be more productive. Increasing women’s access to land, livestock, education, financial services, extension, technology and rural employment would boost their productivity and generate gains in terms of agricultural production, foo d security, economic growth and social welfare. Closing the gender gap in agricultural inputs alone could lift 100–- 150 million people out of hunger. No blueprint exists for closing the gender gap, but some basic principles are universal: governments, the international community and civil society should work together to eliminate discrimination under the law, to promote equal access to resources and opportunities, to ensure that agricultural policies and programmes are gender-aw are, and to make women’s voices heard as equal partners for sustainable development. Achieving gender equality and empowering women in agriculture is not only the right thing to do. It is also crucial for agricultural development and food security.

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