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Management of the lobster fishery in Madagascar









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    Izarasoa Sy Ny Dinan'andavakorana 2016
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    Situated in the remote Anosy region of southeast Madagascar, Sainte Luce is a small fishing community which for generations has relied on fish and lobsters catches for their livelihood. Historically, lobsters were always plentiful, yet in recent years things began to change - stocks declined, catches became smaller and consequently it became more and more difficult for people to earn a living and feed their families from lobster fishing. The fishermen of Sainte Luce made the brave decision to st and and face this challenge. The slogan of the Sainte Luce fishermen is "Model Fishermen - Example to others". Sainte Luce and Azafady, an NGO partner, are proud to produce this educational booklet to tell their story. We hope through this to raise awareness of how other fishermen in Madagascar, and all over the world, can pursue similar initiatives as the Sainte Luce fishermen, to manage their marine resources sustainably. We hope that the story of Limby and Zarasoa will inspire adults and chil dren alike to face the challenges experienced by coastal communities and, like those in our story, find a way to manage their marine resources for the benefit of their communities, ensuring that lobsters are still caught off the coast of Madagascar for many years to come. This project would not have been possible without the support and finances of FAO and IOC-Smartfish Programme, nor without the commitment of the Riaky Committee in Sainte Luce and the support of the 400 fishermen who live there .
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    Rice-fish farming: a development lever for smallholder farming in Madagascar 2014
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    Madagascar is one of the poorest countries in the world and one of the top three countries considered the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change exacerbated by deforestation, natural disasters, chronic poverty, a high dependency on agriculture and a lack of adaptability. Madagascar ranks 154th (out of 185 countries) in the Human Development Index (UNDP 2015), having dropped 19 places between 2010 and 2014 reflecting a difficult internal economic, political and social situation. In fact , according to international thresholds, the poverty rate is 91 per cent (INSTAT/ENSOMD 2012- 2013). According to the national poverty line, 71.5 per cent of Malagasy people are poor and 52.7 per cent are extremely poor, meaning that their resources do not allow them to meet their basic food needs. Poverty in Madagascar is predominantly a rural phenomenon mainly affecting farmers, given that almost 77 per cent of the working population is involved in agriculture. Poverty also comes with another reality, that of the prominence of malnutrition. More than 40 per cent of infant mortality is caused by malnutrition; 47.3 per cent of children under the age of five suffer from acute malnutrition and the overall rate of acute malnutrition is 8.3 per cent (INSTAT/ENSOMD 2012-2013). Chronic malnutrition in children results in irreversible delays in physical and cognitive growth that are part of the vicious circle of poverty. Madagascar lost 14.5 per cent of its gross national product in 2013 beca use of malnutrition, amounting to 1,533.6 million US dollars and 66 per cent of working-age adults (15-64 years) suffered from stunting as a child, representing 8,287,508 people who were unable to reach their true potential1. In response to this challenge a project was launched in 2014 aimed at accelerating the spread of carp aquaculture2 in the rice fields of Madagascar’s Highlands (rice-fish culture) in the regions of Haute Matsiatra, Vakinankaratra, Itasy and Amoron’i Mania. The immediate obj ective of this project is to develop an innovative, inexpensive and far-reaching training circuit in rural areas. Secondary objectives are to both reduce household poverty by providing a source of income and contributing to the reduction of malnutrition through a targeted increase in the availability and consumption of fish. Rice-fish integration makes it possible to optimize the use of land and water resources, in addition to other available facilities, with little investment by combining the p roduction of plant and animal products. Ricefish farming can increase rice yields by 10 to 30 per cent and produce fish with an average yield of 205 kg/ha. In Madagascar, the actual production of fish in rice fields is an estimated 3-5,000 MT per year, but this could go up to 30 to 50,000 MT per year in 30 years with the expected impacts of combatting malnutrition and rural poverty.
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    Promotion of initiatives to ensure the sustainability of the mangrove crab fishery and its value chains in Madagascar 2014
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    The mangrove crab fishery (Scylla scerrata) in Madagascar is an exclusively traditional fishing activity. Crab fishers walk or canoe through the mangroves and use very simple techniques and fishing gear such as a line or a hook mounted on a stick. It is estimated that about 80,000 people are involved in fishing and collecting mangrove crabs in Madagascar. Fishing and landing sites are often very difficult to access, and storage and transport facilities are very rudimentary: this is a sector that has significant post-harvest losses. In recent years, some mangrove areas – those most easily accessible - have already been over-exploited, resulting in a reduction in the average size of crabs caught.

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